BindingMode Enumeration

Describes the direction of the data flow in a binding.

Namespace:  System.Windows.Data
Assembly:  PresentationFramework (in PresentationFramework.dll)

public enum BindingMode
<object property="enumerationMemberName" .../>

Member nameDescription
DefaultUses the default Mode value of the binding target. The default value varies for each dependency property. In general, user-editable control properties, such as those of text boxes and check boxes, default to two-way bindings, whereas most other properties default to one-way bindings. A programmatic way to determine whether a dependency property binds one-way or two-way by default is to get the property metadata of the property using GetMetadata and then check the Boolean value of the BindsTwoWayByDefault property.
OneTimeUpdates the binding target when the application starts or when the data context changes. This type of binding is appropriate if you are using data where either a snapshot of the current state is appropriate to use or the data is truly static. This type of binding is also useful if you want to initialize your target property with some value from a source property and the data context is not known in advance. This is essentially a simpler form of OneWay binding that provides better performance in cases where the source value does not change.
OneWayUpdates the binding target (target) property when the binding source (source) changes. This type of binding is appropriate if the control being bound is implicitly read-only. For instance, you may bind to a source such as a stock ticker. Or perhaps your target property has no control interface provided for making changes, such as a data-bound background color of a table. If there is no need to monitor the changes of the target property, using the OneWay binding mode avoids the overhead of the TwoWay binding mode.
OneWayToSourceUpdates the source property when the target property changes.
TwoWayCauses changes to either the source property or the target property to automatically update the other. This type of binding is appropriate for editable forms or other fully-interactive UI scenarios.

This example shows how to specify whether the binding updates only the binding target (target) property, the binding source (source) property, or both the target property and the source property.

You use the Mode property to specify the direction of the binding. The following enumeration list shows the available options for binding updates:

  • TwoWay updates the target property or the property whenever either the target property or the source property changes.

  • OneWay updates the target property only when the source property changes.

  • OneTime updates the target property only when the application starts or when the DataContext undergoes a change.

  • OneWayToSource updates the source property when the target property changes.

  • Default causes the default Mode value of target property to be used.

For more information, see the BindingMode enumeration.

The following example shows how to set the Mode property.

<TextBlock Name="IncomeText" Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="1"
  Text="{Binding Path=TotalIncome, Mode=OneTime}"/>

To detect source changes (applicable to OneWay and TwoWay bindings), the source must implement a suitable property change notification mechanism such as INotifyPropertyChanged. See How to: Implement Property Change Notification for an example of an INotifyPropertyChanged implementation.

For TwoWay or OneWayToSource bindings, you can control the timing of the source updates by setting the UpdateSourceTrigger property. See UpdateSourceTrigger for more information.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.5, 4, 3.5, 3.0

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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