ProcessThread Class

Represents an operating system process thread.

Namespace:  System.Diagnostics
Assembly:  System (in System.dll)

[HostProtectionAttribute(SecurityAction::LinkDemand, SelfAffectingProcessMgmt = true, 
	SelfAffectingThreading = true)]
public ref class ProcessThread : public Component

NoteNote:

The HostProtectionAttribute attribute applied to this type or member has the following Resources property value: SelfAffectingProcessMgmt | SelfAffectingThreading. The HostProtectionAttribute does not affect desktop applications (which are typically started by double-clicking an icon, typing a command, or entering a URL in a browser). For more information, see the HostProtectionAttribute class or SQL Server Programming and Host Protection Attributes.

NoteNote:

Starting with the .NET Framework version 2.0, the ability to reference performance counter data on other computers has been eliminated for many of the .NET Framework methods and properties. This change was made to improve performance and to enable non-administrators to use the ProcessThread class. As a result, some applications that did not get exceptions in earlier versions of the .NET Framework may now get a NotSupportedException. The methods and properties affected are too numerous to list here, but the exception information has been added to the affected member topics.

Use ProcessThread to obtain information about a thread that is currently running on the system. Doing so allows you, for example, to monitor the thread's performance characteristics.

A thread is a path of execution through a program. It is the smallest unit of execution that Win32 schedules. It consists of a stack, the state of the CPU registers, and an entry in the execution list of the system scheduler.

A process consists of one or more threads and the code, data, and other resources of a program in memory. Typical program resources are open files, semaphores, and dynamically allocated memory. Each resource of a process is shared by all that process's threads.

A program executes when the system scheduler gives execution control to one of the program's threads. The scheduler determines which threads should run and when. A lower-priority thread might be forced to wait while higher-priority threads complete their tasks. On multiprocessor computers, the scheduler can move individual threads to different processors, thus balancing the CPU load.

Each process starts with a single thread, which is known as the primary thread. Any thread can create additional threads. All the threads within a process share the address space of that process.

NoteNote:

The primary thread is not necessarily located at the first index in the collection.

The threads of a process execute individually and are unaware of each other unless you make them visible to each other. Threads that share common resources, however, must coordinate their work by using semaphores or another method of interprocess communication.

To get a collection of all the ProcessThread objects associated with the current process, get the Threads property of the Process instance.

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, Windows XP Starter Edition, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2000 SP4, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows 98

The .NET Framework and .NET Compact Framework do not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.5, 3.0, 2.0, 1.1, 1.0
Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft