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LinearGradientBrush Class

Paints an area with a linear gradient.

Namespace:  System.Windows.Media
Assembly:  PresentationCore (in PresentationCore.dll)
XMLNS for XAML: http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation, http://schemas.microsoft.com/netfx/2007/xaml/presentation
public sealed class LinearGradientBrush : GradientBrush
<LinearGradientBrush>
  GradientStops
</LinearGradientBrush>

A LinearGradientBrush paints an area with a linear gradient. A linear gradient defines a gradient along a line. The line's end points are defined by the StartPoint and EndPoint properties of the linear gradient. A LinearGradientBrush brush paints its GradientStops along this line.

The default linear gradient is diagonal. In the default, the StartPoint of a linear gradient is (0,0), the upper-left corner of the area being painted, and its EndPoint is (1,1), the lower-right corner of the area being painted. The colors in the resulting gradient are interpolated along the diagonal path.

The following illustration shows a diagonal gradient. A line was added to highlight the interpolation path of the gradient from the start point to the end point.

A diagonal linear gradient

Gradient axis for a diagonal linear gradient

The next illustration shows the same linear gradient, but with highlighted gradient stops.

A diagonal linear gradient with highlighted gradient stops

Gradient stops in a linear gradient

It is possible to specify a gradient axis that does not completely fill area being painted. When this occurs, the SpreadMethod property determines how the remaining area is painted.

Freezable Features

A LinearGradientBrush is a type of Freezable object and therefore can be frozen to improve performance. For information about Freezable features, such as freezing and cloning, see Freezable Objects Overview.

This example shows how to use the LinearGradientBrush class to paint an area with a linear gradient. In the following example, the Fill of a Rectangle is painted with a diagonal linear gradient that transitions from yellow to red to blue to lime green.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a diagonal linear gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="1,1">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>
Rectangle diagonalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
diagonalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
diagonalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a diagonal linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myLinearGradientBrush =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myLinearGradientBrush.StartPoint = new Point(0,0);
myLinearGradientBrush.EndPoint = new Point(1,1);
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));

// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
diagonalFillRectangle.Fill = myLinearGradientBrush;

The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A diagonal linear gradient

To create a horizontal linear gradient, change the StartPoint and EndPoint of the LinearGradientBrush to (0,0.5) and (1,0.5). In the following example, a Rectangle is painted with a horizontal linear gradient.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a horizontal linear gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0.5" EndPoint="1,0.5">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>
Rectangle horizontalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
horizontalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
horizontalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a horizontal linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myHorizontalGradient =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myHorizontalGradient.StartPoint = new Point(0,0.5);
myHorizontalGradient.EndPoint = new Point(1,0.5);
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));

// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
horizontalFillRectangle.Fill = myHorizontalGradient; 

The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A horizontal linear gradient

To create a vertical linear gradient, change the StartPoint and EndPoint of the LinearGradientBrush to (0.5,0) and (0.5,1). In the following example, a Rectangle is painted with a vertical linear gradient.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a vertical gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.5,0" EndPoint="0.5,1">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>
Rectangle verticalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
verticalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
verticalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a vertical linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myVerticalGradient =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myVerticalGradient.StartPoint = new Point(0.5,0);
myVerticalGradient.EndPoint = new Point(0.5,1);
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));

// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
verticalFillRectangle.Fill = myVerticalGradient;  

The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A vertical linear gradient
NoteNote:

The examples in this topic use the default coordinate system for setting start points and end points. The default coordinate system is relative to a bounding box: 0 indicates 0 percent of the bounding box , and 1 indicates 100 percent of the bounding box. You can c hange this coordinate system by setting the MappingMode property to the value BrushMappingMode.Absolute. An absolute coordinate system is not relative to a bounding box. Values are interpreted directly in local space.

For additional examples, see Brushes Sample. For more information about gradients and other types of brushes, see Painting with Solid Colors and Gradients Overview.

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP SP2, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003

The .NET Framework and .NET Compact Framework do not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.5, 3.0
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