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RoutedCommand.RoutedCommand(String, Type) Constructor

Initializes a new instance of the RoutedCommand class with the specified name and owner type.

Namespace: System.Windows.Input
Assembly: PresentationCore (in presentationcore.dll)

public RoutedCommand (
	string name,
	Type ownerType
)
public RoutedCommand (
	String name, 
	Type ownerType
)
public function RoutedCommand (
	name : String, 
	ownerType : Type
)
You cannot use constructors in XAML.

Parameters

name

Declared name for serialization.

ownerType

The type which is registering the command.

Exception typeCondition

ArgumentNullException

name is a null reference (Nothing in Visual Basic).

ArgumentException

the length of name is zero.

ArgumentException

ownerType is a null reference (Nothing in Visual Basic).

This example shows how to create a custom RoutedCommand and how to implement the custom command by creating a ExecutedRoutedEventHandler and a CanExecuteRoutedEventHandler and attaching them to a CommandBinding. For more information on commanding, see the Commanding Overview.

The first step in creating a RoutedCommand is defining the command and instantiating it.

public static RoutedCommand CustomRoutedCommand = new RoutedCommand();

In order to use the command in an application, event handlers which define what the command does must be created

public void ExecutedCustomCommand(object sender,
    ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Custom Command Executed");
}

// CanExecuteRoutedEventHandler that only returns true if
// the source is a control.
public void CanExecuteCustomCommand(object sender, 
    CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Control target = e.Source as Control;
    
    if(target != null)
    {
        e.CanExecute = true;
    }
    else
    {
        e.CanExecute = false;
    }
}

Next, a CommandBinding is created which associates the command with the event handlers. The CommandBinding is created on a specific object. This object defines the scope of the CommandBinding in the element tree

<Window x:Class="SDKSamples.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:custom="clr-namespace:SDKSamples"
    Height="600" Width="800"
    >
  <Window.CommandBindings>
    <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static custom:Window1.CustomRoutedCommand}"
                    Executed="ExecutedCustomCommand"
                    CanExecute="CanExecuteCustomCommand" />
  </Window.CommandBindings>

CommandBinding customCommandBinding = new CommandBinding(
    CustomRoutedCommand, ExecutedCustomCommand, CanExecuteCustomCommand);

// attach CommandBinding to root window
this.CommandBindings.Add(customCommandBinding);

The final step is invoking the command. One way to invoke a command is to associate it with a ICommandSource, such as a Button.

<StackPanel>
  <Button Command="{x:Static custom:Window1.CustomRoutedCommand}"
          Content="CustomRoutedCommand"/>
</StackPanel>

// create the ui
StackPanel CustomCommandStackPanel = new StackPanel();
Button CustomCommandButton = new Button();
CustomCommandStackPanel.Children.Add(CustomCommandButton);

CustomCommandButton.Command = CustomRoutedCommand;

When the Button is clicked, the Execute method on the custom RoutedCommand is called. The RoutedCommand raises the PreviewExecuted and Executed routed events. These events traverse the element tree looking for a CommandBinding for this particular command. If a CommandBinding is found, the ExecutedRoutedEventHandler associated with CommandBinding is called.

Windows 98, Windows Server 2000 SP4, Windows CE, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows Mobile for Pocket PC, Windows Mobile for Smartphone, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Starter Edition

The Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 is supported on Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows XP SP2, and Windows Server 2003 SP1.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.0
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