Standard Stereotypes for UML Models

In Visual Studio Ultimate, you can add stereotypes to UML model elements to provide additional information for the reader, or for machine processing. Stereotypes are defined in profiles and each profile provides set of stereotypes. Several profiles are provided with Visual Studio Ultimate.

You can also define your own profiles that can contain your own stereotypes. For more information, see How to: Define a Profile to Extend UML.

The following profiles are available in the Visual Studio Ultimate as soon as you have installed it.

Profile

Purpose

UML Standard Profile L2

A standard set of stereotypes that can be used to add extra information about an element or a relationship.

UML Standard Profile L3

A standard set of stereotypes that can be used to add extra information about an element or a relationship.

C# Profile

If you intend a class or other element in a UML model to represent program code, you can indicate this by applying one of the stereotypes from the C# profile.

These stereotypes also add properties to the model elements.

When you create a new UML model, the UML Standard Profiles L2 and L3 are linked to the model, unless you remove the links.

To use the stereotypes in any of these profiles, you must first link the profile to a package or a model that contains the elements you want to apply them to.

To link a profile to a model or a package

  1. Open UML Model Explorer. On the Architecture menu, point to Windows, and then click UML Model Explorer.

  2. Locate either a package or a model that contains all the elements to which you will want to apply the stereotypes in the profile.

  3. Right-click the package or the model and then click Properties.

  4. In the Properties window, set the Profiles property to the profiles that you want.

To remove the link between a profile and a model or package

  1. In UML Model Explorer, right-click the model or package and then click Properties.

  2. In the Properties window, set the Profiles property to empty.

    Note Note

    You can unlink a profile only if none of the elements in the model or package use that profile's stereotypes.

To apply a stereotype to a model element

  1. Right-click the model element either on a diagram or in UML Model Explorer, and then click Properties.

  2. Click the Stereotypes property and select the stereotypes you want to apply.

    The selected stereotypes appear within «chevrons» in the model element, for most kinds of element.

    Note Note

    If you cannot see the Stereotypes property, or if the stereotype you want does not appear, verify that the model element is inside a package or a model to which the appropriate profile has been linked.

  3. Some stereotypes allow you to set the values of additional properties for the model element. To see these properties, expand the Stereotypes property.

The following stereotypes can be used to specialize the meaning of UML model elements, unless the link to the profile has been removed from the model.

The exact meaning of these stereotypes is determined by your own local conventions, and by any tools that you might use to process the model.

Stereotype

Applies to

Meaning

auxiliary

Class

A class that supports another class, typically by implementing additional logic. The other class may have the «focus» stereotype.

call

Dependency

The client class calls the operations of the supplier.

create

Dependency

The client class creates instances of the supplier.

create

Message

The sender creates the receiver.

create

Operation

This operation is a constructor.

derive

Dependency

The client element is computed completely or partly from the supplier.

destroy

Operation

The operation destroys its instance.

document

Artifact

A «file» that is not a source or an executable.

entity

Component

The component represents a business concept.

executable

Artifact

An executable «file».

file

Artifact

A physical file.

focus

Class

A class defining the core business logic, that is supported by several «auxiliary» classes.

framework

Package

This package defines a reusable design pattern.

implement

Component

The implementation of a «specification».

implementationClass

Class

The class describes an implementation, and each runtime instance has one fixed implementation class. Contrast with «type».

instantiate

Dependency

The client creates instances of the supplier.

library

Artifact

A library «file».

metaclass

Class

Instances of this class are also classes.

modelLibrary

Package

Contains model elements intended to be reused by importing packages. Typically defined as part of a profile, and imported automatically by application of the profile.

process

Component

A transaction-based component, or one that carries a thread.

realization

Class, Interface, Component

Describes an implementation.

refine

Dependency

The client class, component, or package provides more information about the specification or design than the supplier.

responsibility

Dependency

The Comment at the supplier end of the Dependency defines the responsibilities of the client class or component.

script

Artifact

An interpretable «file».

send

Dependency

The source Operation sends the target Signal.

service

Component

A stateless component.

source

Artifact

A compilable «file».

specification

Class, Interface, Component

Defines the behavior of a component or object without defining how it works internally.

subsystem

Component

A part of a large system. A subsystem on a use case diagram is a component with the subsystem stereotype.

trace

Dependency

The client element is part of the design that realizes the supplier. The two ends of this dependency are typically in different models. One of these models is a realization of the other.

type

Class

Specifies the behavior of an object without stating how it is implemented. An object is a member of a type if it conforms to the specification.

utility

Class

A collection of static functions. The class has no instances.

The following stereotypes can be used to specialize the meaning of UML model elements, unless the profile has been unlinked from the model.

The exact meaning of these stereotypes is determined by your own local conventions, and by any tools that you might use to process the model.

Stereotype

Applies to

Description

buildComponent

Component

A collection of elements used to define a build.

metaModel

Model

Defines a modeling language such as a variant of UML, or a domain specific language.

systemModel

Model

A model that is a collection of models that apply to the same system, for example, a specification, a realization, and trace relationships between them.

The stereotypes defined in this profile let you indicate that a model element is intended for translation to program code. Each stereotype defines additional properties that you can set on the model element.

To make these stereotypes available, link a model or package to the C# Profile. You can then apply the stereotypes to model elements in that model or package.

The available stereotypes, the elements to which they apply, and the additional properties that they make available are summarized in the following table.

Stereotype

Applies to

Properties

C# Class

UML Class

Component

Clr Attributes

Is Partial

Is Sealed

Is Static

Is Unsafe

Package visibility

C# struct

UML Class

Component

Clr Attributes

Is Partial

Is Unsafe

Package visibility

C# global members

UML Class

Component

Clr Attributes

C# Interface

UML Interface

Clr Attributes

Is Partial

Package visibility

C# enum

UML Enumeration

ClrAttributes

Base Type

C# namespace

UML Package

Clr Attributes

Base Name

Using namespaces

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