Debug your app using saved IntelliTrace data

Go to specific points in your application's execution when you start debugging from an IntelliTrace log (.iTrace) file. This file can contain performance events, exceptions, threads, test steps, modules, and other system info that IntelliTrace records while your app runs.

Make sure that you have:

On a computer with Visual Studio Ultimate, open the .iTrace file.

  • Double-click the .iTrace file outside Visual Studio, or open the file from inside Visual Studio.

    - or -

  • If the .iTrace file is attached to a Team Foundation Server work item, follow these steps in the work item:

    • Under All Links, find the .iTrace file. Open it.

      - or -

    • Under Repro Steps, choose the IntelliTrace link.

Tip Tip

If you closed the IntelliTrace file during debugging, you can reopen it easily. Go to the Debug menu, choose IntelliTrace, Show Log Summary. You can also choose Show Log Summary in the IntelliTrace window. This is available only while debugging with IntelliTrace.

Some of the following sections in the .iTrace file appear only if you collected data from a particular source, for example, from Test Manager or from SharePoint applications.

Section

Contains

Collection Source

Performance Violations

Performance events with function calls that exceed the configured threshold

Microsoft Monitoring Agent, either alone or with System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager for ASP.NET web apps hosted on IIS

Exception Data

Exceptions, including the full call stack for each exception

All sources

Analysis

For SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013 applications only. Diagnose IntelliTrace and SharePoint events, such as debugger events, ULS events, unhandled exceptions, and other data that the Microsoft Monitoring Agent recorded.

Microsoft Monitoring Agent, either alone or with System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager

System Info

Settings and specifications of the host system

All sources

Threads List

Threads that ran during collection

All sources

Test Data

Test steps and their results from a test session

Test Manager

Modules

Modules that the target process loaded in the order that they loaded.

All sources

Here's some tips to help you find information in each section:

  • Choose a column header to sort data.

  • Use the search box to filter data. Plain text search works across all columns except the time columns. You can also filter searches to a specific column with one filter per column. Type the column name with no spaces, a colon (:), and the search value. Follow this with a semicolon (;) to add another column and search value.

    For example, to find performance events that have the word "slow" in the Description column, type:

    Description:slow

Review the performance events that were recorded for your app. You can hide those events that don't happen often.

To start debugging from a performance event

  1. Under Performance Violations, review the recorded performance events, their total execution times, and other event information. Then dig deeper into the methods that were called during a specific performance event.

    View performance event details

    You can also just double-click the event.

  2. On the event page, review the execution times for these calls. Find a slow call in the execution tree.

    The slowest calls appear in their own section when you have multiple calls, nested or otherwise.

  3. Expand that call to review any nested calls and parameter values that were recorded at that point in time.

    (Keyboard: To show or hide a nested call, press the Right Arrow or Left Arrow key respectively. To show and hide parameter values for a nested call, press the Space key.)

    Start debugging from the call.

    Start debugging from method call

    You can also just double-click the call or press the Enter key.

    If the method is in your application code, Visual Studio goes to that method.

    Go to application code from performance event

    Now you can review other recorded values, the call stack, step through your code, or use the IntelliTrace window to move backwards or forwards "in time" between other methods that were called during this performance event.

Review the exceptions that were thrown and recorded for your app. You can group exceptions that have the same type and call stack so that you see only the most recent exception.

To start debugging from an exception

  • Under Exception Data, review the recorded exception events, their types, messages, and when the exceptions happened. To dig deeper into the code, start debugging from the most recent event in a group of exceptions.

    Start debugging from exception event

    You can also just double-click the event. If the events aren't grouped, choose Debug This Event.

    If the exception happened in your application code, Visual Studio goes to where the exception happened.

    Go to application code from an exception event

    Now you can review other recorded values, the call stack, or use the IntelliTrace window to move backwards or forwards "in time" between other recorded events, related code, and the values recorded at those points in time.

    Column

    Shows the

    Type

    .NET type of the exception

    Newest Message for grouped exceptions or Message for ungrouped exceptions

    The message provided by the exception

    Count for grouped exceptions

    The number of times the exception was thrown

    Thread ID for ungrouped exceptions

    ID of the thread that threw the exception

    Newest Event Time or Event Time

    Time stamp recorded when the exception was thrown

    Call Stack

    Call stack for an exception.

    To see the call stack, choose an exception in the list. The call stack appears below the exception list.

Diagnose problems with SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013 applications by using a SharePoint correlation ID or review any unhandled exceptions that Microsoft Monitoring Agent found.

  • Use a SharePoint correlation ID to find its matching web request and events. Choose an event and then start debugging at the point where and when the event happened.

  • If Microsoft Monitoring Agent found unhandled exceptions, choose an exception and then start debugging at the point where and when the exception happened.

Start debugging with a SharePoint correlation ID

  1. Copy the SharePoint correlation ID from its source.

    For example:

    IntelliTrace - SharePoint error - correlation ID

  2. Open the .iTrace file, then go to Analysis and enter the SharePoint correlation ID to review the matching web request and recorded events.

    IntelliTrace log - Enter SharePoint correlation ID

  3. Under Request Events, examine the events. Starting from the top, events appear in the order that they happened.

    1. Choose an event to see its details.

    2. Choose Start Debugging to start debugging at the point where the event happened.

    IntelliTrace log file - View web request + events

You can see these kinds of SharePoint events along with IntelliTrace events:

  • User profile events

    These events happen when SharePoint loads a user profile and when user profile properties are read or changed.

  • Unified Logging System (ULS) events

    Microsoft Monitoring Agent records a subset of SharePoint ULS events and these fields:

    IntelliTrace field

    SharePoint ULS field

    Id

    EventID

    Level

    Level

    Category Id

    Category Id

    Category

    Category

    Area

    Product

    Output

    Message

    Correlation Id

    Correlation Id

Start debugging from an unhandled exception

  1. Choose a SharePoint correlation ID for an exception. Exceptions are grouped by type and call stack.

  2. (Optional) Expand Call Stack to see the call stack for a group of exceptions.

  3. Choose Debug Exception to start debugging at the point where and when the exception happened.

    IntelliTrace log - SharePoint unhandled exceptions

For a walkthrough, see Walkthrough: Debugging a SharePoint Application by Using IntelliTrace. For the kinds of data that the agent records, see Record code execution with IntelliTrace while debugging.

Examine the recorded threads that ran in the target process. You can start debugging from the first valid IntelliTrace event in a selected thread.

To start debugging from a specific thread

  1. Under Threads List, choose a thread.

  2. At the bottom of Threads List, choose Start Debugging. You can also double-click a thread.

    To start debugging from where the app begins, double-click Main Thread. See Record code execution with IntelliTrace while debugging.

Thread data that the user creates might be more useful than threads that a server creates and manages for IIS-hosted Web apps.

Column

Shows the

ID

Thread ID number

Name

Thread name. Unnamed threads appear as "<No Name>".

Start Time

Time the thread was created

End Time

Time the thread was completed

Examine the IntelliTrace data that Test Manager recorded while testing your app.

To start debugging from a specific test step

  1. Expand Test Steps Grid. Choose a test step.

  2. At the bottom of Test Steps Grid, choose Start Debugging. You can also double-click a test step.

    This starts debugging from the first valid IntelliTrace event after the selected test step.

    When test data exists, IntelliTrace tries to resolve the associated Team Foundation Server build that was used to perform the test run. If the build is found, the associated symbols for the app are resolved automatically.

Field

Shows the

Test Session

Test sessions that were recorded. Typically, there is only one. This list is empty if test data was created using a manual exploratory test.

Test Case

Test cases from the selected test session. This list is empty if test data was created using a manual exploratory test.

Test Steps Grid

Test steps that were recorded with the test result of pass or fail

This section shows you details about the system that hosted the app, for example, hardware, operating system, environmental and process-specific information.

This section shows you the modules that the target process loaded. Modules appear in the order that they loaded.

Column

Shows the

Module Name

Module file name

Module Path

Disk location where the module was loaded

Module ID

Unique identifier of the module that is version-specific and contributes to the matching symbol (PDB) files. See [OBSOLETE] How to: Specify Symbol Locations and Loading Behavior.

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