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List<T>.Add Method

Adds an object to the end of the List<T>.

Namespace:  System.Collections.Generic
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public void Add(
	T item
)

Parameters

item
Type: T
The object to be added to the end of the List<T>. The value can be null for reference types.

Implements

ICollection<T>.Add(T)

List<T> accepts null as a valid value for reference types and allows duplicate elements.

If Count already equals Capacity, the capacity of the List<T> is increased by automatically reallocating the internal array, and the existing elements are copied to the new array before the new element is added.

If Count is less than Capacity, this method is an O(1) operation. If the capacity needs to be increased to accommodate the new element, this method becomes an O(n) operation, where n is Count.

The following code example demonstrates several properties and methods of the List<T> generic class, including the Add method. The default constructor is used to create a list of strings with a capacity of 0. The Capacity property is displayed, and then the Add method is used to add several items. The items are listed, and the Capacity property is displayed again, along with the Count property, to show that the capacity has been increased as needed.

Other properties and methods are used to search for, insert, and remove elements from the list, and finally to clear the list.


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Example
{
   public static void Demo(System.Windows.Controls.TextBlock outputBlock)
   {
      List<string> dinosaurs = new List<string>();

      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("\nCapacity: {0}", dinosaurs.Capacity) + "\n";

      dinosaurs.Add("Tyrannosaurus");
      dinosaurs.Add("Amargasaurus");
      dinosaurs.Add("Mamenchisaurus");
      dinosaurs.Add("Deinonychus");
      dinosaurs.Add("Compsognathus");

      outputBlock.Text += "\n";
      foreach (string dinosaur in dinosaurs)
      {
         outputBlock.Text += dinosaur + "\n";
      }

      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("\nCapacity: {0}", dinosaurs.Capacity) + "\n";
      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("Count: {0}", dinosaurs.Count) + "\n";

      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("\nContains(\"Deinonychus\"): {0}",
          dinosaurs.Contains("Deinonychus")) + "\n";

      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("\nInsert(2, \"Compsognathus\")") + "\n";
      dinosaurs.Insert(2, "Compsognathus");

      outputBlock.Text += "\n";
      foreach (string dinosaur in dinosaurs)
      {
         outputBlock.Text += dinosaur + "\n";
      }

      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("\ndinosaurs[3]: {0}", dinosaurs[3]) + "\n";

      outputBlock.Text += "\nRemove(\"Compsognathus\")" + "\n";
      dinosaurs.Remove("Compsognathus");

      outputBlock.Text += "\n";
      foreach (string dinosaur in dinosaurs)
      {
         outputBlock.Text += dinosaur + "\n";
      }

      dinosaurs.TrimExcess();
      outputBlock.Text += "\nTrimExcess()" + "\n";
      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("Capacity: {0}", dinosaurs.Capacity) + "\n";
      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("Count: {0}", dinosaurs.Count) + "\n";

      dinosaurs.Clear();
      outputBlock.Text += "\nClear()" + "\n";
      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("Capacity: {0}", dinosaurs.Capacity) + "\n";
      outputBlock.Text += String.Format("Count: {0}", dinosaurs.Count) + "\n";
   }
}

/* This code example produces the following output:

Capacity: 0

Tyrannosaurus
Amargasaurus
Mamenchisaurus
Deinonychus
Compsognathus

Capacity: 8
Count: 5

Contains("Deinonychus"): True

Insert(2, "Compsognathus")

Tyrannosaurus
Amargasaurus
Compsognathus
Mamenchisaurus
Deinonychus
Compsognathus

dinosaurs[3]: Mamenchisaurus

Remove("Compsognathus")

Tyrannosaurus
Amargasaurus
Mamenchisaurus
Deinonychus
Compsognathus

TrimExcess()
Capacity: 5
Count: 5

Clear()
Capacity: 5
Count: 0
 */


Silverlight

Supported in: 5, 4, 3

Silverlight for Windows Phone

Supported in: Windows Phone OS 7.1, Windows Phone OS 7.0

XNA Framework

Supported in: Xbox 360, Windows Phone OS 7.0

For a list of the operating systems and browsers that are supported by Silverlight, see Supported Operating Systems and Browsers.

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