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TriggerBase.ExitActions Property

Gets a collection of TriggerAction objects to apply when the trigger object becomes inactive. This property does not apply to the EventTrigger class.

Namespace:  System.Windows
Assembly:  PresentationFramework (in PresentationFramework.dll)
XMLNS for XAML: http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation, http://schemas.microsoft.com/netfx/2007/xaml/presentation

'Declaration
Public ReadOnly Property ExitActions As TriggerActionCollection
<object>
  <object.ExitActions>
    OneOrMoreTriggerActions
  </object.ExitActions >
</object>

XAML Values

OneOrMoreTriggerActions

One or more TriggerAction objects.

Property Value

Type: System.Windows.TriggerActionCollection
The default value is Nothing.

This property does not apply to the EventTrigger class because an event represents a point in time while EnterActions and ExitActions correspond to object states. For EventTrigger objects, use the Actions property instead.

NoteNote

This property can only be set in Extensible Application Markup Language (XAML) via the collection syntax shown, or by accessing the collection object and using its various methods such as Add. The property to access the collection object itself is read-only, the collection itself is read-write.

This example shows how to use a Trigger to start a Storyboard when a property value changes. You can use a Trigger inside a Style, ControlTemplate, or DataTemplate.

The following example uses a Trigger to animate the Opacity of a Button when its IsMouseOver property becomes true.


<!-- PropertyTriggerExample.xaml
     Shows how to use property triggers to start animations. -->
<Page
  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
  xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
  WindowTitle="Animate Properties with Storyboards">
  <Page.Resources>

    <Style x:Key="PropertyTriggerExampleButtonStyle" TargetType="{x:Type Button}">

      <Setter Property="Opacity" Value="0.25" />

      <Style.Triggers>
        <Trigger Property="IsMouseOver" Value="True">

          <Trigger.EnterActions>
            <BeginStoryboard>
              <Storyboard>
                <DoubleAnimation Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                  To="1" Duration="0:0:1" />
              </Storyboard>
            </BeginStoryboard>
          </Trigger.EnterActions>
          <Trigger.ExitActions>
            <BeginStoryboard>
              <Storyboard>
                <DoubleAnimation Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"
                  To="0.25" Duration="0:0:1" />
              </Storyboard>
            </BeginStoryboard>
          </Trigger.ExitActions>          
        </Trigger>               
      </Style.Triggers>    
    </Style>
  </Page.Resources>

  <StackPanel Margin="20">

    <Button Style="{StaticResource PropertyTriggerExampleButtonStyle}">
      Move the mouse over me.
    </Button>

  </StackPanel>
</Page>


Animations applied by property Trigger objects behave in a more complex fashion than EventTrigger animations or animations started using Storyboard methods. They "handoff" with animations defined by other Trigger objects, but compose with EventTrigger and method-triggered animations.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4, 3.5, 3.0

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Windows 7, Windows Vista SP1 or later, Windows XP SP3, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core supported with SP1 or later), Windows Server 2003 SP2

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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