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LinearGradientBrush.StartPoint Property

Gets or sets the starting two-dimensional coordinates of the linear gradient.

Namespace: System.Windows.Media
Assembly: PresentationCore (in presentationcore.dll)
XML Namespace:  http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation

public Point StartPoint { get; set; }
/** @property */
public Point get_StartPoint ()

/** @property */
public void set_StartPoint (Point value)

public function get StartPoint () : Point

public function set StartPoint (value : Point)

<object>
  <object.StartPoint>
    <Point .../>
  </object.StartPoint>
</object>
<object StartPoint="Point" .../>

Property Value

The starting two-dimensional coordinates for the linear gradient. The default is (0, 0). This is a dependency property.

Identifier field

StartPointProperty

Metadata properties set to true

None

A LinearGradientBrush paints a gradient along a line. The line's start and end points are defined by the StartPoint and EndPoint properties of the LinearGradientBrush.

The default linear gradient is diagonal. In the default, the StartPoint of a linear gradient is (0,0), the upper-left corner of the area being filled, and its EndPoint is (1,1), the lower-right corner of the area being filled. The colors in the resulting gradient are interpolated along the diagonal path.

The following image shows a diagonal gradient. The black line was added to highlight the interpolation path of the gradient from the start point to the end point.

A diagonal linear gradient


Gradient axis for a diagonal linear gradient

Specifying Relative or Absolute Values

Note that the MappingMode property of a LinearGradientBrush determines whether its StartPoint is interpreted as a relative or absolute value. A MappingMode of RelativeToBoundingBox specifies that the EndPoint value is relative to the size of the painted area. A MappingMode of Absolute specifies that the StartPoint value is expressed in device independent pixels. By default, the MappingMode is set to RelativeToBoundingBox, making the StartPoint a relative value.

This example shows how to use the LinearGradientBrush class to paint an area with a linear gradient. In the following example, the Fill of a Rectangle is painted with a diagonal linear gradient that transitions from yellow to red to blue to lime green.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a diagonal linear gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0" EndPoint="1,1">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>

Rectangle diagonalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
diagonalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
diagonalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a diagonal linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myLinearGradientBrush =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myLinearGradientBrush.StartPoint = new Point(0,0);
myLinearGradientBrush.EndPoint = new Point(1,1);
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myLinearGradientBrush.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));
    
// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
diagonalFillRectangle.Fill = myLinearGradientBrush;

The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A diagonal linear gradient

To create a horizontal linear gradient, change the StartPoint and EndPoint of the LinearGradientBrush to (0,0.5) and (1,0.5). In the following example, a Rectangle is painted with a horizontal linear gradient.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a horizontal linear gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0,0.5" EndPoint="1,0.5">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>

Rectangle horizontalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
horizontalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
horizontalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a horizontal linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myHorizontalGradient =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myHorizontalGradient.StartPoint = new Point(0,0.5);
myHorizontalGradient.EndPoint = new Point(1,0.5);
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myHorizontalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));
    
// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
horizontalFillRectangle.Fill = myHorizontalGradient; 


The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A horizontal linear gradient

To create a vertical linear gradient, change the StartPoint and EndPoint of the LinearGradientBrush to (0.5,0) and (0.5,1). In the following example, a Rectangle is painted with a vertical linear gradient.

<!-- This rectangle is painted with a vertical gradient. -->
<Rectangle Width="200" Height="100">
  <Rectangle.Fill>
    <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.5,0" EndPoint="0.5,1">
      <GradientStop Color="Yellow" Offset="0.0" />
      <GradientStop Color="Red" Offset="0.25" />
      <GradientStop Color="Blue" Offset="0.75" />
      <GradientStop Color="LimeGreen" Offset="1.0" />
    </LinearGradientBrush>
  </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>

Rectangle verticalFillRectangle = new Rectangle();
verticalFillRectangle.Width = 200;
verticalFillRectangle.Height = 100;

// Create a vertical linear gradient with four stops.   
LinearGradientBrush myVerticalGradient =
    new LinearGradientBrush();
myVerticalGradient.StartPoint = new Point(0.5,0);
myVerticalGradient.EndPoint = new Point(0.5,1);
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Yellow, 0.0));
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Red, 0.25));                
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.Blue, 0.75));        
myVerticalGradient.GradientStops.Add(
    new GradientStop(Colors.LimeGreen, 1.0));
    
// Use the brush to paint the rectangle.
verticalFillRectangle.Fill = myVerticalGradient;  

The following illustration shows the gradient created by the previous example.

A vertical linear gradient

For additional examples, see the Brushes Sample. For more information about gradients and other types of brushes, see Painting with WPF Brushes.

Windows 98, Windows Server 2000 SP4, Windows CE, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows Mobile for Pocket PC, Windows Mobile for Smartphone, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Starter Edition

The Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 is supported on Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows XP SP2, and Windows Server 2003 SP1.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.0

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