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ISerializable Interface

Allows an object to control its own serialization and deserialization.

Namespace:  System.Runtime.Serialization
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

[<ComVisibleAttribute(true)>]
type ISerializable =  interface end

The ISerializable type exposes the following members.

  NameDescription
Public methodGetObjectDataPopulates a SerializationInfo with the data needed to serialize the target object.
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Any class that might be serialized must be marked with the SerializableAttribute. If a class needs to control its serialization process, it can implement the ISerializable interface. The Formatter calls the GetObjectData at serialization time and populates the supplied SerializationInfo with all the data required to represent the object. The Formatter creates a SerializationInfo with the type of the object in the graph. Objects that need to send proxies for themselves can use the FullTypeName and AssemblyName methods on SerializationInfo to change the transmitted information.

In the case of class inheritance, it is possible to serialize a class that derives from a base class that implements ISerializable. In this case, the derived class should call the base class implementation of GetObjectData inside its implementation of GetObjectData. Otherwise, the data from the base class will not be serialized.

The ISerializable interface implies a constructor with the signature constructor (SerializationInfo information, StreamingContext context). At deserialization time, the current constructor is called only after the data in the SerializationInfo has been deserialized by the formatter. In general, this constructor should be protected if the class is not sealed.

The order in which objects are deserialized cannot be guaranteed. For example, if one type references a type that has not been deserialized yet, an exception will occur. If you are creating types that have such dependencies, you can work around the problem by implementing the IDeserializationCallback interface and the OnDeserialization method.

The serialization architecture handles object types that extend MarshalByRefObject the same as types that extend Object. These types can be marked with the SerializableAttribute and implement the ISerializable interface as any other object type. Their object state will be captured and persisted onto the stream.

When these types are being used through System.Runtime.Remoting, the remoting infrastructure provides a surrogate that preempts typical serialization and instead serializes a proxy to the MarshalByRefObject. A surrogate is a helper that knows how to serialize and deserialize objects of a particular type. The proxy, invisible to the user in most cases, will be of type ObjRef.

As a general design pattern, it would be unusual for a class to be both marked with the serializable attribute and extend MarshalByRefObject. Developers should think carefully about the possible serialization and remoting scenarios when combining these two characteristics. One example where this might be applicable is with a MemoryStream. While the base class of MemoryStream (Stream) extends from MarshalByRefObject, it is possible to capture the state of a MemoryStream and restore it at will. It might, therefore, be meaningful to serialize the state of this stream into a database and restore it at some later point in time. However, when used through remoting, an object of this type would be proxied.

For more information about serialization of classes that extend MarshalByRefObject, see RemotingSurrogateSelector. For more information about implementing ISerializable, see Custom Serialization.

Notes to Implementers

Implement this interface to allow an object to take part in its own serialization and deserialization.

The following code example demonstrates the use of the ISerializable interface to define custom serialization behavior for a class.

No code example is currently available or this language may not be supported.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.5.2, 4.5.1, 4.5, 4, 3.5, 3.0, 2.0, 1.1, 1.0

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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