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HttpListenerResponse.KeepAlive Property

Note: This property is new in the .NET Framework version 2.0.

Gets or sets a value indicating whether the server requests a persistent connection.

Namespace: System.Net
Assembly: System (in system.dll)

public:
property bool KeepAlive {
	bool get ();
	void set (bool value);
}
/** @property */
public boolean get_KeepAlive ()

/** @property */
public void set_KeepAlive (boolean value)

public function get KeepAlive () : boolean

public function set KeepAlive (value : boolean)

Property Value

true if the server requests a persistent connection; otherwise, false. The default is true.
Exception typeCondition

ObjectDisposedException

This object is closed.

If an HTTP client and server expect to exchange data multiple times in a short period, a persistent connection speeds up their communications by allowing them to avoid the overhead required to open and close a TCP connection for each message. Persistent connections are in widespread use in communications between modern Web browsers and Web servers.

Persistent connections are described in detail in the HTTP/1.1 protocol specification (RFC 2616) available at the RTF Editor Web site (http://www.rfc-editor.org).

The following code example demonstrates setting the value of this property.


// When the client is not authenticated, there is no Identity.
if (context.User == null)
{
    message.Append ("<HTML><BODY><p> Hello local user! </p></BODY></HTML>");
}
else
{
    // Get the requester's identity.
    System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
    // Construct the response body.
    message.AppendFormat ("<HTML><BODY><p> Hello {0}!<br/>", 
        identity.Name);
    message.AppendFormat ("You were authenticated using {0}.</p>", 
        identity.AuthenticationType);
    message.Append ("</BODY></HTML>");
}

// Configure the response.
HttpListenerResponse response = context.Response;

// Use the encoding from the response if one has been set.
// Otherwise, use UTF8.
System.Text.Encoding encoding = response.ContentEncoding;
if (encoding == null)
{
    encoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
    response.ContentEncoding = encoding;
}
byte[] buffer = encoding.GetBytes (message.ToString ());
response.ContentLength64 = buffer.Length;
response.StatusCode = (int) HttpStatusCode.OK;
response.StatusDescription = "OK";
response.ProtocolVersion = new Version ("1.1");
// Don't keep the TCP connection alive; 
// We don't expect multiple requests from the same client.
response.KeepAlive = false;
// Write the response body.
System.IO.Stream stream = response.OutputStream;
stream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

Windows 98, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Starter Edition

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 2.0
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