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Math.Pow Method

Returns a specified number raised to the specified power.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

'Declaration
<SecuritySafeCriticalAttribute> _
Public Shared Function Pow ( _
	x As Double, _
	y As Double _
) As Double

Parameters

x
Type: System.Double
A double-precision floating-point number to be raised to a power.
y
Type: System.Double
A double-precision floating-point number that specifies a power.

Return Value

Type: System.Double
The number x raised to the power y.

The following table indicates the return value when various values or ranges of values are specified for the x and y parameters. For more information, see Double.PositiveInfinity, Double.NegativeInfinity, and Double.NaN.

Parameters

Return Value

x or y = NaN

NaN

x = Any value except NaN; y = 0

1

x = NegativeInfinity; y < 0

0

x = NegativeInfinity; y is a positive odd integer

NegativeInfinity

x = NegativeInfinity; y is positive but not an odd integer

PositiveInfinity

x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity

NaN

x = -1; y = NegativeInfinity or PositiveInfinity

NaN

-1 < x < 1; y = NegativeInfinity

PositiveInfinity

-1 < x < 1; y = PositiveInfinity

0

x < -1 or x > 1; y = NegativeInfinity

0

x < -1 or x > 1; y = PositiveInfinity

PositiveInfinity

x = 0; y < 0

PositiveInfinity

x = 0; y > 0

0

x = 1; y is any value except NaN

1

x = PositiveInfinity; y < 0

0

x = PositiveInfinity; y > 0

PositiveInfinity

The following example uses the Pow method to calculate the value that results from raising 2 to a power ranging from 0 to 32.


Public Module Example
   Public Sub Demo(ByVal outputBlock As System.Windows.Controls.TextBlock)
      Dim value As Integer = 2
      For power As Integer = 0 To 32
         outputBlock.Text += String.Format("{0}^{1} = {2:N0} (0x{2:X})", _
                           value, power, CLng(Math.Pow(value, power))) + vbCrLf
      Next
   End Sub
End Module
' The example displays the following output:
'       2^0 = 1 (0x1)
'       2^1 = 2 (0x2)
'       2^2 = 4 (0x4)
'       2^3 = 8 (0x8)
'       2^4 = 16 (0x10)
'       2^5 = 32 (0x20)
'       2^6 = 64 (0x40)
'       2^7 = 128 (0x80)
'       2^8 = 256 (0x100)
'       2^9 = 512 (0x200)
'       2^10 = 1,024 (0x400)
'       2^11 = 2,048 (0x800)
'       2^12 = 4,096 (0x1000)
'       2^13 = 8,192 (0x2000)
'       2^14 = 16,384 (0x4000)
'       2^15 = 32,768 (0x8000)
'       2^16 = 65,536 (0x10000)
'       2^17 = 131,072 (0x20000)
'       2^18 = 262,144 (0x40000)
'       2^19 = 524,288 (0x80000)
'       2^20 = 1,048,576 (0x100000)
'       2^21 = 2,097,152 (0x200000)
'       2^22 = 4,194,304 (0x400000)
'       2^23 = 8,388,608 (0x800000)
'       2^24 = 16,777,216 (0x1000000)
'       2^25 = 33,554,432 (0x2000000)
'       2^26 = 67,108,864 (0x4000000)
'       2^27 = 134,217,728 (0x8000000)
'       2^28 = 268,435,456 (0x10000000)
'       2^29 = 536,870,912 (0x20000000)
'       2^30 = 1,073,741,824 (0x40000000)
'       2^31 = 2,147,483,648 (0x80000000)
'       2^32 = 4,294,967,296 (0x100000000)


Silverlight

Supported in: 5, 4, 3

Silverlight for Windows Phone

Supported in: Windows Phone OS 7.1, Windows Phone OS 7.0

XNA Framework

Supported in: Xbox 360, Windows Phone OS 7.0

For a list of the operating systems and browsers that are supported by Silverlight, see Supported Operating Systems and Browsers.

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