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DateTimeOffset.ToLocalTime Method

Converts the current DateTimeOffset object to a DateTimeOffset object that represents the local time.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)
public DateTimeOffset ToLocalTime()

Return Value

Type: System.DateTimeOffset
An object that represents the date and time of the current DateTimeOffset object converted to local time.

In performing the conversion to local time, the method first converts the current DateTimeOffset object's date and time to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by subtracting the offset from the time. It then converts the UTC date and time to local time by adding the local time zone offset. In doing this, it takes account of any adjustment rules for the local time zone.

Both the value of the current DateTimeOffset object and the value of the DateTimeOffset object returned by the method call represent the same point in time. That is, if both are passed to the DateTimeOffset.Equals(DateTimeOffset, DateTimeOffset) method, the method will return true.

If the conversion causes a time that is out of range of the DateTimeOffset type, the ToLocalTime method returns a DateTimeOffset object that has the date and time set to either MaxValue or MinValue and the offset set to the local time zone offset.

The following example uses the ToLocalTime method to convert a DateTimeOffset value to local time in the Pacific Standard Time zone. It also illustrates the method's support for the local time zone's adjustment rules.

// Local time changes on 3/11/2007 at 2:00 AM
DateTimeOffset originalTime, localTime;

originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 3, 11, 3, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(-6, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());   

originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 3, 11, 4, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(-6, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());    

// Define a summer UTC time
originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 6, 15, 8, 0, 0, 
                                  TimeSpan.Zero);
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(),
                                           localTime.ToString());    

// Define a winter time
originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 11, 30, 14, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(3, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());
// The example produces the following output: 
//    Converted 3/11/2007 3:00:00 AM -06:00 to 3/11/2007 1:00:00 AM -08:00. 
//    Converted 3/11/2007 4:00:00 AM -06:00 to 3/11/2007 3:00:00 AM -07:00. 
//    Converted 6/15/2007 8:00:00 AM +00:00 to 6/15/2007 1:00:00 AM -07:00. 
//    Converted 11/30/2007 2:00:00 PM +03:00 to 11/30/2007 3:00:00 AM -08:00.                                                           

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.5.1, 4.5, 4, 3.5 SP1, 3.0 SP1, 2.0 SP1

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Portable Class Library

Supported in: Portable Class Library

.NET for Windows Store apps

Supported in: Windows 8

.NET for Windows Phone apps

Supported in: Windows Phone 8.1, Windows Phone 8, Silverlight 8.1

Windows Phone 8.1, Windows Phone 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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