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DateTimeOffset.ToLocalTime Method

Updated: January 2010

Converts the current DateTimeOffset object to a DateTimeOffset object that represents the local time.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public DateTimeOffset ToLocalTime()

Return Value

Type: System.DateTimeOffset
A DateTimeOffset object that represents the date and time of the current DateTimeOffset object converted to local time.

In performing the conversion to local time, the method first converts the current DateTimeOffset object's date and time to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by subtracting the offset from the time. It then converts the UTC date and time to local time by adding the local time zone offset.

Important noteImportant Note:

   The ToLocalTime method recognizes only the current adjustment rule when converting from UTC to local time. As a result, conversions for periods before the current adjustment rule came into effect may not accurately reflect the difference between UTC and local time.

Both the value of the current DateTimeOffset object and the value of the DateTimeOffset object returned by the method call represent the same point in time. That is, if both are passed to the DateTimeOffset.Equals(DateTimeOffset, DateTimeOffset) method, the method will return true.

If the conversion causes a time that is out of range of the DateTimeOffset type, the ToLocalTime method returns a DateTimeOffset object that has the date and time set to either MaxValue or MinValue and the offset set to the local time zone offset.

The following example uses the ToLocalTime method to convert a DateTimeOffset value to local time in the Pacific Standard Time zone. It also illustrates the method's support for the local time zone's adjustment rules.

// Local time changes on 3/11/2007 at 2:00 AM
DateTimeOffset originalTime, localTime;

originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 3, 11, 3, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(-6, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());   

originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 3, 11, 4, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(-6, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());    

// Define a summer UTC time
originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 6, 15, 8, 0, 0, 
                                  TimeSpan.Zero);
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(),
                                           localTime.ToString());    

// Define a winter time
originalTime = new DateTimeOffset(2007, 11, 30, 14, 0, 0, 
                                  new TimeSpan(3, 0, 0));
localTime = originalTime.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine("Converted {0} to {1}.", originalTime.ToString(), 
                                           localTime.ToString());
// The example produces the following output: 
//    Converted 3/11/2007 3:00:00 AM -06:00 to 3/11/2007 1:00:00 AM -08:00. 
//    Converted 3/11/2007 4:00:00 AM -06:00 to 3/11/2007 3:00:00 AM -07:00. 
//    Converted 6/15/2007 8:00:00 AM +00:00 to 6/15/2007 1:00:00 AM -07:00. 
//    Converted 11/30/2007 2:00:00 PM +03:00 to 11/30/2007 3:00:00 AM -08:00.                                                           

Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP SP2, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003

The .NET Framework and .NET Compact Framework do not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.5 SP1, 3.0 SP1, 2.0 SP1

Date

History

Reason

January 2010

Added a note that only the current adjustment rule is considered in the conversion.

Content bug fix.

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