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ReadOnlyCollectionBase Class

Provides the abstract base class for a strongly typed non-generic read-only collection.

Namespace: System.Collections
Assembly: mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

[SerializableAttribute] 
[ComVisibleAttribute(true)] 
public abstract class ReadOnlyCollectionBase : ICollection, IEnumerable
/** @attribute SerializableAttribute() */ 
/** @attribute ComVisibleAttribute(true) */ 
public abstract class ReadOnlyCollectionBase implements ICollection, IEnumerable
SerializableAttribute 
ComVisibleAttribute(true) 
public abstract class ReadOnlyCollectionBase implements ICollection, IEnumerable
Not applicable.

A ReadOnlyCollectionBase instance is always read-only. See CollectionBase for a modifiable version of this class.

Notes to Implementers: This base class is provided to make it easier for implementers to create a strongly typed read-only custom collection. Implementers are encouraged to extend this base class instead of creating their own. Members of this base class are protected and are intended to be used through a derived class only. This class makes the underlying collection available through the InnerList property, which is intended for use only by classes that are derived directly from ReadOnlyCollectionBase. The derived class must ensure that its own users cannot modify the underlying collection.

The following code example implements the ReadOnlyCollectionBase class.

using System;
using System.Collections;

public class ROCollection : ReadOnlyCollectionBase  {

   public ROCollection( IList sourceList )  {
      InnerList.AddRange( sourceList );
   }

   public Object this[ int index ]  {
      get  {
         return( InnerList[index] );
      }
   }

   public int IndexOf( Object value )  {
      return( InnerList.IndexOf( value ) );
   }

   public bool Contains( Object value )  {
      return( InnerList.Contains( value ) );
   }

}


public class SamplesCollectionBase  {

   public static void Main()  {

      // Create an ArrayList.
      ArrayList myAL = new ArrayList();
      myAL.Add( "red" );
      myAL.Add( "blue" );
      myAL.Add( "yellow" );
      myAL.Add( "green" );
      myAL.Add( "orange" );
      myAL.Add( "purple" );
 
      // Create a new ROCollection that contains the elements in myAL.
      ROCollection myCol = new ROCollection( myAL );

      // Display the contents of the collection using foreach. This is the preferred method.
      Console.WriteLine( "Contents of the collection (using foreach):" );
      PrintValues1( myCol );

      // Display the contents of the collection using the enumerator.
      Console.WriteLine( "Contents of the collection (using enumerator):" );
      PrintValues2( myCol );

      // Display the contents of the collection using the Count property and the Item property.
      Console.WriteLine( "Contents of the collection (using Count and Item):" );
      PrintIndexAndValues( myCol );

      // Search the collection with Contains and IndexOf.
      Console.WriteLine( "Contains yellow: {0}", myCol.Contains( "yellow" ) );
      Console.WriteLine( "orange is at index {0}.", myCol.IndexOf( "orange" ) );
      Console.WriteLine();

   }
 
   // Uses the Count property and the Item property.
   public static void PrintIndexAndValues( ROCollection myCol )  {
      for ( int i = 0; i < myCol.Count; i++ )
         Console.WriteLine( "   [{0}]:   {1}", i, myCol[i] );
      Console.WriteLine();
   }

   // Uses the foreach statement which hides the complexity of the enumerator.
   // NOTE: The foreach statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   public static void PrintValues1( ROCollection myCol )  {
      foreach ( Object obj in myCol )
         Console.WriteLine( "   {0}", obj );
      Console.WriteLine();
   }

   // Uses the enumerator. 
   // NOTE: The foreach statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   public static void PrintValues2( ROCollection myCol )  {
      System.Collections.IEnumerator myEnumerator = myCol.GetEnumerator();
      while ( myEnumerator.MoveNext() )
         Console.WriteLine( "   {0}", myEnumerator.Current );
      Console.WriteLine();
   }

}


/* 
This code produces the following output.

Contents of the collection (using foreach):
   red
   blue
   yellow
   green
   orange
   purple

Contents of the collection (using enumerator):
   red
   blue
   yellow
   green
   orange
   purple

Contents of the collection (using Count and Item):
   [0]:   red
   [1]:   blue
   [2]:   yellow
   [3]:   green
   [4]:   orange
   [5]:   purple

Contains yellow: True
orange is at index 4.

*/


import System.*;
import System.Collections.*;

public class ROCollection extends ReadOnlyCollectionBase
{
    public ROCollection(IList sourceList) 
    {
        get_InnerList().AddRange(sourceList);
    } //ROCollection
   
    /** @property 
     */
    public Object get_Item(int index)
    {
        return get_InnerList().get_Item(index);
    } //get_Item
     
    public int IndexOf(Object value) 
    {
        return get_InnerList().IndexOf(value);
    } //IndexOf
   
    public boolean Contains(Object value) 
    {
        return get_InnerList().Contains(value);
    } //Contains
} //ROCollection

public class SamplesCollectionBase
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // Create an ArrayList.
        ArrayList myAL = new ArrayList();
        myAL.Add("red");
        myAL.Add("blue");
        myAL.Add("yellow");
        myAL.Add("green");
        myAL.Add("orange");
        myAL.Add("purple");
          
        // Create a new ROCollection that contains the elements in myAL.
        ROCollection myCol = new ROCollection(myAL);
          
        // Display the contents of the collection using for. This is the 
        // preferred method.
        Console.WriteLine("Contents of the collection (using for):");
        PrintValues1(myCol);
          
        // Display the contents of the collection using the enumerator.
        Console.WriteLine("Contents of the collection (using enumerator):");
        PrintValues2(myCol);
          
        // Display the contents of the collection using the Count property and 
        // the Item property.
        Console.WriteLine("Contents of the collection (using Count and Item):");
        PrintIndexAndValues(myCol);
          
        // Search the collection with Contains and IndexOf.
        Console.WriteLine("Contains yellow: {0}",
            (System.Boolean)myCol.Contains("yellow"));
        Console.WriteLine("orange is at index {0}.", 
            (Int32)myCol.IndexOf("orange"));
        Console.WriteLine();
    } //main
    
    // Uses the Count property and the Item property.
    public static void PrintIndexAndValues(ROCollection myCol) 
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < myCol.get_Count(); i++) {
            Console.WriteLine("   [{0}]:   {1}",(Int32)i, myCol.get_Item(i));
        } 
        Console.WriteLine();
    } //PrintIndexAndValues
   
    // Uses the for statement which hides the complexity of the enumerator.
    // NOTE: The for statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents
    // of a collection.
    public static void PrintValues1(ROCollection myCol) 
    {
        for (int iCtr = 0; iCtr < myCol.get_Count(); iCtr++ ) {
            Object obj = myCol.get_Item(iCtr);
            Console.WriteLine("   {0}", obj);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    } //PrintValues1
     
    // Uses the enumerator. 
    // NOTE: The for statement is the preferred way of enumerating the
    // contents of a collection.
    public static void PrintValues2(ROCollection myCol) 
    {
        System.Collections.IEnumerator myEnumerator = myCol.GetEnumerator();
        while(myEnumerator.MoveNext()) {
            Console.WriteLine("   {0}", myEnumerator.get_Current());
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    } //PrintValues2
} //SamplesCollectionBase
 
/* 
This code produces the following output.

Contents of the collection (using for):
   red
   blue
   yellow
   green
   orange
   purple

Contents of the collection (using enumerator):
   red
   blue
   yellow
   green
   orange
   purple

Contents of the collection (using Count and Item):
   [0]:   red
   [1]:   blue
   [2]:   yellow
   [3]:   green
   [4]:   orange
   [5]:   purple

Contains yellow: True
orange is at index 4.

*/

System.Object
  System.Collections.ReadOnlyCollectionBase
     Derived Classes

Public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

This implementation does not provide a synchronized (thread safe) wrapper for a ReadOnlyCollectionBase, but derived classes can create their own synchronized versions of the ReadOnlyCollectionBase using the SyncRoot property.

Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. Even when a collection is synchronized, other threads can still modify the collection, which causes the enumerator to throw an exception. To guarantee thread safety during enumeration, you can either lock the collection during the entire enumeration or catch the exceptions resulting from changes made by other threads.

Windows 98, Windows Server 2000 SP4, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Starter Edition

The Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 is supported on Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows XP SP2, and Windows Server 2003 SP1.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.0, 2.0, 1.1, 1.0

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