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CharEnumerator.Current Property

Gets the currently referenced character in the string enumerated by this CharEnumerator object.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public char Current { get; }

Property Value

Type: System.Char
The Unicode character currently referenced by this CharEnumerator object.

Implements

IEnumerator<T>.Current

ExceptionCondition
InvalidOperationException

The index is invalid; that is, it is before the first or after the last character of the enumerated string.

The CharEnumerator class maintains an internal index to the enumerated string, and the Current property returns the character that is currently referenced by the index. This property should be invoked only when the index is valid; otherwise, an exception is thrown.

The index is always invalid for an empty string (""). The index is also invalid after the String.GetEnumerator or Reset method is called. After either of these methods is called, invoke the MoveNext method to adjust the index to the first character in the enumerated string. The index is valid whenever the MoveNext method returns true.

Current does not move the index, and consecutive calls to Current return the same character until MoveNext, Reset, or String.GetEnumerator is called.

The following example uses the CharEnumerator class to enumerate the individual characters in a string. It instantiates a CharEnumerator object by calling the String.GetEnumerator method, moves from one character to the next by calling the MoveNext method, and displays the current character by retrieving the value of the Current property.

string title = "A Tale of Two Cities";
CharEnumerator chEnum = title.GetEnumerator();
int ctr = 1;
string outputLine1 = null;
string outputLine2 = null;
string outputLine3 = null; 

while (chEnum.MoveNext())
{
   outputLine1 += ctr < 10 || ctr % 10 != 0 ? "  " : (ctr / 10) + " ";
   outputLine2 += (ctr % 10) + " ";
   outputLine3 += chEnum.Current + " ";
   ctr++;
}

Console.WriteLine("The length of the string is {0} characters:", 
                  title.Length);
Console.WriteLine(outputLine1);
Console.WriteLine(outputLine2);    
Console.WriteLine(outputLine3);
// The example displays the following output to the console:       
//       The length of the string is 20 characters: 
//                         1                   2 
//       1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 
//       A   T a l e   o f   T w o   C i t i e s

Note, however, that the same operation can be performed somewhat more intuitively by using foreach (in C#) or For Each (in Visual Basic), as the following example shows.

string title = "A Tale of Two Cities";
int ctr = 1;
string outputLine1 = null;
string outputLine2 = null;
string outputLine3 = null; 

foreach (char ch in title)
{
   outputLine1 += ctr < 10 || ctr % 10 != 0 ? "  " : (ctr / 10) + " ";
   outputLine2 += (ctr % 10) + " ";
   outputLine3 += ch + " ";
   ctr++;
}

Console.WriteLine("The length of the string is {0} characters:", 
                  title.Length);
Console.WriteLine(outputLine1);
Console.WriteLine(outputLine2);    
Console.WriteLine(outputLine3);
// The example displays the following output to the console:       
//       The length of the string is 20 characters: 
//                         1                   2 
//       1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 
//       A   T a l e   o f   T w o   C i t i e s

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.5.2, 4.5.1, 4.5, 4, 3.5, 3.0, 2.0, 1.1, 1.0

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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