Exchange Management Shell evaluation criteria

Exchange

Published: July 16, 2012

Find evaluation criteria for using the Exchange Management Shell to create scripts and applications to manage your Exchange server.

Applies to:  Exchange 2013 | Exchange Online | Exchange Server 2007 | Exchange Server 2010 | Office 365 

In this article
Functional criteria for the Exchange Management Shell
Development criteria for the Exchange Management Shell
Security criteria for the Exchange Management Shell
Deployment criteria for the Exchange Management Shell
Additional resources

The Exchange Management Shell is a command-line management interface that is used to administer servers in Exchange organizations. The Exchange Management Shell is built on Windows PowerShell technology.

You can use the Exchange Management Shell to create scripts and applications that manage your Exchange servers. If you use the Exchange Management Shell, make sure that you create the role-based access controls and auditing policies that enable you to meet your organization's security and accountability requirements.

The following table lists the functional criteria for the Exchange Management Shell. For descriptions of the functional criteria, see Functional criteria in the Exchange development technology evaluation criteria descriptions article.

Table 1:  Exchange Management Shell functional criteria

Criterion

Description

Application function

The Exchange Management Shell is used in command-line scripts and managed applications that administer Exchange servers.

Availability

Exchange Management Shell commands are installed on all servers running versions of Exchange starting with Exchange 2007. Client applications can be deployed on any computer running Windows PowerShell 2.0. The Exchange Management Shell is not supported with Exchange Online.

Application architecture

You can use the Exchange Management Shell from the command line directly, in scripts, or from managed applications with a Windows or web-based user interface.

Remote usage

All use of the Exchange Management Shell is handled as a remote call, even when your script or application is interacting with an Exchange server on the same physical system.

Major objects

The Exchange Management Shell uses the Windows PowerShell object model to access Exchange objects, such as mailboxes, settings, and configuration information.

Data access model

The Exchange Management Shell provides information as a Windows PowerShell property bag holding the property and method values of the underlying objects.

Threading model

The Exchange Management Shell does not require any particular threading model. Whether to use threaded application execution for managed clients is an implementation-specific choice.

Transactions

The Exchange Management Shell does not use transactions.

Management capabilities

You can use the Exchange Management Shell to administer an Exchange server and to record the Windows PowerShell commands in a Command Log. You can also use the Exchange Management Shell to read the Windows Event logs.

The following table lists the development criteria for the Exchange Management Shell. For descriptions of the development criteria, see Development criteria in the Exchange development technology evaluation criteria descriptions article.

Table 2:  Exchange Management Shell development criteria

Criterion

Description

Languages and tools

You can create Exchange Management Shell scripts in any text editor. Numerous third-party tools for creating Windows PowerShell scripts that can be used with the Exchange Management Shell are available. The Exchange Management Shell object model is based on the .NET Framework. Any .NET language can be used to develop managed applications by using the Exchange Management Shell.

Managed implementation

The Exchange Management Shell has a managed API.

Scriptable

The Exchange Management Shell is scriptable.

Test/debug tools

Numerous third-party applications exist to test and debug Windows PowerShell scripts that can be used with Exchange Management Shell scripts. Visual Studio and third-party tools can be used to test and debug managed Exchange Management Shell applications.

Expert availability

You can find developers who can create Exchange Management Shell scripts and applications by visiting the Exchange Server forums on TechNet.

Available information

Information about the Exchange Management Shell is available on TechNet, in the Exchange 2010 Management Shell SDK, and in forums and blogs. Third-party books are available for the Exchange Management Shell. For more information about using the Exchange Management Shell from the command line, see Exchange Management Shell on TechNet.

Developer/deployment licensing

Refer to your Exchange Server and MSDN subscription licensing agreements to determine whether additional licenses are required for the computers on which you develop and deploy your Exchange Management Shell applications.

The following table lists the security criteria for the Exchange Management Shell. For descriptions of the security criteria, see Security criteria in the Exchange development technology evaluation criteria descriptions article.

Table 3:  Exchange Management Shell security criteria

Criterion

Description

Design-time permissions

You must have role-based access permissions for any Exchange Management Shell command called by the application or script.

Setup permissions

You do not need any specific permissions for setup. Installing managed client applications requires the user to have rights to install software.

Run-time permissions

Running an Exchange Management Shell application requires that the user have role-based access control rights to the affected data on the Exchange store.

Built-in security features

Exchange Management Shell commands can only be executed by users with role-based access control rights to the command. For more information about role-based access control, see Understanding Role Based Access Control on TechNet.

Security monitoring features

Exchange can log each command run in the Exchange Management Shell. For more information, see Administrator Audit Logging on TechNet.

The following table lists the deployment criteria for the Exchange Management Shell. For descriptions of the deployment criteria, see Deployment criteria in the Exchange development technology evaluation criteria descriptions article.

Table 4:  Exchange Management Shell deployment criteria

Criterion

Description

Server platform requirements

The Exchange Management Shell can be used on any Exchange server that has Windows PowerShell 2.0 installed.

Client platform requirements

Exchange Management Shell client applications require Windows PowerShell 2.0.

Deployment methods

Exchange Management Shell client applications are deployed based on their client architecture and technology.

Deployment notes

None.

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