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Application Interoperability: Microsoft .NET and J2EE

 

Retired Content

This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

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patterns & practices Developer Center

Shop for patterns and practices books online [Content link no longer available, original URL:http://shop.microsoft.com/practices/]

Peter Laudati, Microsoft Corporation; William Loeffler, Microsoft Corporation; David Aiken, Arkitec; Keith Organ, Arkitec; Anthony Steven, Content Master Ltd; Mike Preradovic, Intrinsyc Software; Wayne Citrin, JNBridge, Inc.; Peter Clift, VMC Consulting

December 2003

Summary

Application Interoperability: Microsoft .NET and J2EE presents interoperability best practices, and illustrates these approaches with a functional sample application. It shows how to link Microsoft .NET and J2EE, using Web services, runtime bridges, and asynchronous techniques.

Contents

Who Should Read This Guide
What Is In This Guide
Feedback and Support
Collaborators

Who Should Read This Guide

This guide is aimed at developers who are responsible for creating and implementing enterprise level business applications based on either Microsoft .NET or on J2EE and where interoperability between the two platforms is a requirement.

This guide is written for readers in one or more of the following categories:

  • The sections targeted at .NET developers assume an understanding of the development process for distributed applications and familiarity with the Microsoft Visual Studio .NET programming tools. The sample applications are in C# (C Sharp), so development experience in this language is essential. Experience with the .NET Framework SDK and the MSDN… Library are also of benefit.
  • The sections targeted at Java developers assume a familiarity with Java programming methods and tools, in particular Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) and Java APIs such as Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) and the Java Messaging Service (JMS).

What Is in This Guide

This book consists of nine chapters and two appendices. The contents of each chapter are as follows:

Chapter 1: Introduction

Welcome to this guide about Microsoft… .NET and Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) Interoperability. This book gives you the best information available about how to ensure that enterprise applications based on J2EE work in harmony with components based on Microsoft .NET and vice versa. If you are developer with responsibility for implementing interoperability between these two platforms in an enterprise environment, then this book is for you.

The information in this book is both practical and prescriptive. Rather than discuss every possible interoperability technique in detail, it focuses on the three most likely scenarios and shows how to solve those specific challenges. If you want more in-depth discussions of the concepts behind this material, refer to resources such as Simon Guest's book, Microsoft .NET and J2EE Interoperability Toolkit, Microsoft Press, ISBN 0-7356-1922-0.

The focus is very much on enterprise or data center environments, where scalability, throughput, reliability and security are the main operating requirements. It is not intended as a manual for how to write .NET or J2EE applications, but how to get these components to work together while minimizing any compromises to operational effectiveness.

Chapter 2: Understanding Enterprise Platforms

Chapter 2 consists of two parts. The first part looks at .NET from the perspective of an experienced J2EE developer. It links .NET concepts to principles that you already understand, showing where the two platforms differ and where they are similar. The second part of this chapter is the mirror image, providing equivalent information but for the experienced .NET developer. It introduces you to the enterprise features of J2EE and explains how Java applications work in distributed environments.

Chapter 3: Interoperability Fundamentals

Chapter 3 looks at the fundamentals of connecting .NET and Java-based applications, concentrating on the exchange of data between the two technologies. The main focus is on ensuring that both platforms agree on data types, particularly with complex data types.

Chapter 4: Interoperability Technologies: Point to Point

Chapter 4 concentrates on the point to point communication methods of XML Web services and .NET Remoting. Topics include binary communication and routing, together with the use of third-party runtime bridges for integrating Java and .NET.

Chapter 5: Interoperability Technologies: Data Tier

This chapter continues on from Chapter 4 to concentrate on techniques that apply to the Data or Resource tier. Techniques covered include shared databases and asynchronous message queuing. Finally, this chapter briefly covers other asynchronous techniques such as using the MSMQ-MQSeries Bridge in Microsoft Host Integration Server.

Chapter 6: Implementing Interoperability Design Elements

Chapter 6 takes the concepts from Chapters 4 and 5 and describes how you can implement these ideas in enterprise-class application. It looks at best practices in both J2EE and .NET programming, emphasizing the role of abstraction layers in applications. The chapter moves on to showing how you would implement abstraction layers such as service interfaces and interoperability adapters in your design. Finally, it details how the sample application implements interoperability using these elements.

Chapter 7: Integrating .NET in the Presentation Tier

Chapter 7 uses the XBikes example to illustrate the scenario where you want to integrate ASP.NET Presentation tier components while keeping the existing J2EE Business tier. This allows an organization to preserve its existing investment in J2EE and take advantage of the enriched client experience that ASP.NET provides.

Chapter 8: Integrating .NET in the Business Tier

In Chapter 8, you see how the XBikes example can integrate new .NET Business tier components, while preserving the same JSP-based front end. This solution is appropriate for companies that want to maintain the same client experience but modify the Business tier. Adding .NET components allows for rapid development of business logic components or allows the use of third-party .NET Framework based products.

Chapter 9: Implementing Asynchronous Interoperability

The final chapter looks at interoperability using messaging components in the Data Resource tier. Taking the XBikes sample code, it shows how you can use Messaging components such as Microsoft Message Queue or Java Messaging Service implementations to connect to message queues, providing asynchronous operation, providing support for transactions and long running operations.

Appendix A: Installing XBikes on J2EE

Detailed steps for installing the XBikes sample application on J2EE.

Appendix B: Installing XBikes on .NET

Detailed steps for installing the XBikes sample application on Microsoft .NET.

Feedback and Support

Application Interoperability: Microsoft .NET and J2EE presents interoperability best practices, and illustrates these approaches with a functional sample application. It shows how to link Microsoft .NET and J2EE, using Web services, runtime bridges, and asynchronous techniques.

The example code is provided as source code that you can use "as-is" or customized for your application. Support is available on a best effort basis through the feedback alias.

Collaborators

Many thanks to the following advisors who provided invaluable assistance:

  • Gianpaolo Carraro, Microsoft Corporation
  • Simon Guest, Microsoft Corporation
  • Sandy Khaund, Microsoft Corporation
  • Arvindra Sehmi, Microsoft Corporation

Thanks also to the many contributors who assisted us in the production, in particular:

  • RoAnn Corbisier, Microsoft Corporation
  • Chris Sfanos, Microsoft Corporation
  • Tina Burden, Entirenet

Finally, thanks to the company that agreed to participate in our user experience test:

  • Infosys Technologies

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patterns & practices Developer Center

Retired Content

This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

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