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Predefined Configurations in Windows CE .NET

Windows CE .NET
 

Charlie Montgomery
Microsoft Corporation

Updated June 2003

Applies to:
    Platform developers seeking more information about the predefined configurations that are included with Microsoft® Windows® CE .NET.

Summary

This article shows the basic configurations available for current and recently released versions of Platform Builder.

Predefined Configurations

Microsoft Platform Builder comes with basic predefined configurations that help developers get started creating an operating system (OS) for a specific type of device. They are intended to reduce both product development time, when used in combination with a board support package (BSP), and the time it takes to put your product on the market. Once a basic configuration has been chosen, you can modify it to suit your specific needs.

The following table shows the basic configurations included with Platform Builder versions 4.0, 4.1, and 4.2.

Configuration 4.0 4.1 4.2 Description
Custom Device Configuration X X X Provides the starting point for devices that require a fully customizable software configuration. These devices range from simple network devices with no display to full-featured appliances with graphical displays, Internet browsing capabilities, and rich multimedia playback features.
Digital Imaging Device X X   Provides the starting point for digital imaging devices that range from cameras with wireless connectivity to network printers and multi-function peripherals.
Digital Media Receiver Configuration

(Known as Media Appliance in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the starting point for devices that play back or store music, video, and other electronic media.
Enterprise Terminal Configuration

(Known as Retail Point-of-Sale Device in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides a starting point for business terminals and transaction devices such as self-service kiosks, electronic payment terminals, and retail point-of-sale terminals.
Enterprise Web Pad Configuration

(Known as Web Pad in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the basic functionality for consumer Web pads with a touch-screen user interface (UI) and 640 x 480 or larger display.
Gateway Configuration

(Known as Residential Gateway in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the starting point for network devices that connect to the Internet with a dial-up or broadband connection, and that share that connection with a wired or wireless home network.
Industrial Controller Configuration

(Known as Industrial Automation Device in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the starting point for industrial devices, such as human-machine interface (HMI) panels or programmable logic controllers (PLCs).
Internet Appliance Configuration X X X Provides the starting point for stationary, browser-based consumer Internet appliances with a fixed display, such as a CRT or LCD, and a keyboard.
IP Phone Configuration     X Provides the starting point for an Internet-based phone using Voice over IP (VoIP). Devices range from a basic phone with no graphical UI to an advanced phone with a graphical UI. These devices can include Windows Messenger and a browser.
Mobile Handheld Configuration

(Known as PDA or Mobile Handheld Device in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the starting point for a range of mobile devices with a clamshell-and-keyboard design.
Mobile Phone Configuration

(Known as Cell Phone/Smart Phone in versions earlier than 4.2.)

X X X Provides the standard OS features required for building mobile handsets with wireless data, rich graphics, and 160 x 220 nominal display resolution. The Mobile Phone configuration includes the Microsoft Windows® CE Standard Shell and can optionally include Microsoft Pocket Internet Explorer, Inbox electronic messaging software, and Microsoft ActiveSync® 3.0 technologies.
Set-Top Box Configuration X X X Provides functionality for devices that are connected to a television for display of Internet and media content. This configuration includes the Windows CE Standard Shell with a browser-based TV UI. The TV navigation features are turned on by default in the browser.

A typical application might be a video-over-DSL set-top box with a browser-based TV UI.

Tiny Kernel Configuration X X X Provides a starting point for the smallest functional Windows CE OS image.
Windows Thin Client Configuration X X X Provides the starting point for remote-desktop terminals and includes those features necessary to support a remote desktop device, such as a constrained shell and the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP).

For more information about user scenarios for configurations in Windows CE .NET, see Configuration Selection in the product documentation.

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