Export (0) Print
Expand All

Bindings Property Parameter Format 

The Bindings property has a specific parameter format which you must follow, or you will get an error. The parameters required are following.

Bindings Property Parameters

The parameter format is: Scope::ModifierKeys1+Key1,ModifierKeys2+Key2.

The following shows two keybindings that apply to one command in the Global scope. These key bindings are Ctrl-Shift-D followed by the O key and Ctrl-Shift-D followed by the F key: Global::Ctrl+Shift+D,O,Ctrl+Shift+D,F.

In this case, the modifier keys and key values are:

Parameter Value

Scope

Global

ModifierKeys1

Ctrl+Shift+D

Key1

O

ModifierKeys2

Ctrl+Shift+D

Key2

F

If you are using Visual Studio with the default settings, then the assigned shortcut key for the File.NewFile command is Global::Ctrl+N. This means that pressing and holding CTRL while pressing N displays the New File dialog box. The Global keyword means that the command works in all areas of Visual Studio.

Scope

The Scope parameter indicates the context in which the shortcut key works. The Global keyword defines that it works anywhere in Visual Studio, while a specific scope defines that it works only in that scope. Global is the most often used scope. The available values for Scope depend on the package.

For example, CTRL+B makes the selected text bold when in the HTML editor, but the same key combination displays the Debugger Breakpoints dialog box if no editor is active. If you were to apply a Global scope to this shortcut key combination, then CTRL+B would work (or attempt to work) the same everywhere in Visual Studio, rather than only in the HTML editor.

Regardless of the scope you use, you must follow it with two colons (::) before specifying the other parameters.

Modifier Keys1

Modifier keys are system keys that you press while pressing another key. The available modifier keys are CTRL, SHIFT, and ALT. You can combine more than one modifier key by separating them with a + sign. For example: CTRL+ALT+X or SHIFT+ALT+Y. You can also specify multiple letters, such as CTRL+ALT+Y, N, meaning you press CTRL+ALT+Y and then the N key.

Key1

A key is any key on a standard 102-key keyboard. Excluded keys on newer keyboards are: the Windows key, multimedia keys (such as favorites, volume, stop, etc.), and the Fn key on some portable computers. Keys other than the standard letter and number keys are known as virtual keys. The following table lists all virtual keys that the Bindings property accepts. Any virtual key not in this list is ignored.

BACK

DELETE

INSERT

SPACE

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

F10

F11

F12

F13

F14

F15

F16

F17

F18

F19

F20

F21

F22

F23

F24

RETURN

CANCEL

UP

DOWN

LEFT

RIGHT

TAB

HOME

END

PRIOR

NEXT

ESCAPE

DECIMAL

MULTIPLY

SUBTRACT

ADD

DIVIDE

NUMPAD0

NUMPAD1

NUMPAD2

NUMPAD3

NUMPAD4

NUMPAD5

NUMPAD6

NUMPAD7

NUMPAD8

NUMPAD9

Modifier Keys2 and Key2

These optional additional keys allow you to expand your command groups and avoid shortcut key collisions. For example, you could assign CTRL+SHIFT+D, O to open a file into the file editor, and you could assign CTRL+SHIFT+D, S to save the file. Also, this allows you to group similar commands under more or less the same key combination for ease of use and memorization. It also avoids expending all of the shorter available shortcut keys commonly used by other commands.

See Also

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft