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Field Reference Name Naming Conventions

You can define a field reference name using alphanumeric, underscore, and hyphen characters. Each field reference name must contain at least one period, (.), but no period can appear at the start or the end of the name. A field reference name cannot start with a number or an underscore, and a field reference name cannot have multiple consecutive hyphens, such as (--).

The following examples show valid field reference names, in various namespaces.

System Namespace Examples

System.Id

System.Title

System.CreatedBy

System.CreationDate

System.ChangedBy

System.ChangedDate

System.State

System.Reason

Microsoft Namespace Examples

Microsoft.Common.Status

Microsoft.Common.Priority

Microsoft.Scheduling.Duration

Microsoft.Scheduling.PercentComplete

Microsoft.Testing.TestCaseName

Examples in Other Namespaces

Customers and partners can also define their own namespaces to support their custom work item types. For example, the fictitious company Trey Research might define the following custom work item types:

TreyResearch.Common.Severity

TreyResearch.Common.Phase

TreyResearch.RiskManagement.RiskType

TreyResearch.RiskManagement.Resolution

The fictitious software company A. Datum Corporation might define the following work item types:

A_Datum.Common.BusinessPriority

A_Datum.Bug.FoundInPhase

A_Datum.Bug.FixInPhase

Field reference names can be up to 70 characters in length.

Team Foundation Server prevents you from creating your own System.X field because it might impede Team Foundation Server functionality.

Team Foundation Server does not prevent you from creating your own Microsoft.X field. However, this practice is strongly discouraged because it might impede Team Foundation Server functionality.

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