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Windows App Certification Kit tests for Windows Store apps

Applies to Windows only

The Windows App Certification Kit contains a number of tests that can help ensure that your app is ready to be published on the Windows Store.

Tests performed on Windows Store apps

Test namePossible test resultsCertification requirements testedOS Applicability

Crashes & hangs test

Pass

Fail

Crashes and hangs

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

App manifest compliance test

Pass

Fail

App manifest*

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Windows security features test

Pass

Fail

Binary analyzer

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Banned file analyzer*

Private code signing

Supported Windows Store API test

Pass

Fail

Supported APIs

The test is applicable to both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

The updates in Windows App Certification Kit 3.0 and later are applicable only for Windows 8.1

Performance test

Pass

Fail

Bytecode generation

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Optimized binding references

Performance launch

Performance suspend

App manifest resources test

Pass

Fail

App resources validation*

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Branding validation

Debug configuration test

Pass

Fail

Debug configuration

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

File encoding test

Pass

Fail

UTF-8 file encoding

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Direct3D feature level test

Pass

Fail

Direct3D feature level support

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Direct3D Trim after suspend

Windows 8.1

App capabilities test

Pass

Fail

Special use capabilities

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Windows Runtime metadata validation

Pass

Fail

ExclusiveTo attribute test

The test is applicable to both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

The updates in Windows App Certification Kit 3.0 and later are applicable only for Windows 8.1

Type location test

Type name case-sensitivity test

Type name correctness test

General metadata correctness test

Properties test

Package Sanity check

Pass

Fail

Platform appropriate files

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Supported directory structure check

Windows 8

Windows 8.1

Resource Usage test

Pass

Fail

WinJS background task test

Windows 8.1

* indicates the test has been updated in the Windows App Certification Kit 3.3

 

Tests for Windows Store app certification

Crashes and hangs test

Monitors the app during certification testing to record when it crashes or hangs.

Background

Apps that stop responding or crash can cause the user to lose data and have a poor experience.

We expect apps to be fully functional without the use of Windows compatibility modes, AppHelp messages, or compatibility fixes.

Apps must not list DLLs to load in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows\AppInit_DLLs registry key.

Test details

We test the app resilience and stability throughout the certification testing.

The Windows App Certification Kit calls IApplicationActivationManager::ActivateApplication to launch Windows Store apps. For ActivateApplication to launch an app, User Account Control (UAC) must be enabled and the screen resolution must be at least 1024 x 768 or 768 x 1024. If either condition is not met, your app will fail this test.

Corrective actions

Make sure UAC is enabled on the test computer.

Make sure you are running the test on a computer with large enough screen.

If your app fails to launch and your test platform satisfies the prerequisites of ActivateApplication, you can troubleshoot the problem by reviewing the activation event log. To find these entries in the event log:

  1. Open eventvwr.exe and navigate to the Application and Services Log\Microsoft\Windows\Immersive-Shell folder.
  2. Filter the view to show Event Ids: 5900-6000.
  3. Review the log entries for info that might explain why the app didn't launch.

Troubleshoot the file with the problem, identify and fix the problem. Rebuild and re-test the app. You can also check if a dump file was generated in the Windows App Certification Kit log folder that can be used to debug your app.

App manifest compliance test

Test the contents of app manifest to make sure its contents are correct.

Background

Apps must have a correctly formatted app manifest.

Test details

Examines the app manifest to verify the contents are correct as described in the Package metadata requirements.

  • File extensions and protocols

    Your app can declare the file extensions that it wants to associate with. Used improperly, an app can declare a large number of file extensions, most of which it may not even use, resulting in a bad user experience. This test will add a check to limit the number of file extensions that an app can associate with.

  • Framework Dependency rule

This test enforces the requirement that Windows Store apps for Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 each take appropriate dependencies on the Windows Runtime. If there is an inappropriate dependency, this test will fail.

The following is the matrix of frameworks and their applicability to Windows App Model versions.

FrameworkOS MinRuns on Windows 8Runs on Windows 8.1Supports Windows 8 appsSupports Windows 8.1 apps
Microsoft.Media.PlayReadyClient6.2.1YesYesYesNo
Microsoft.Media.PlayReadyClient.26.3.0NoYesNoYes
Microsoft.VCLibs.110.006.2.1YesYesYesYes
Microsoft.VCLibs.120.006.3.0NoYesNoYes
Microsoft.WinJS.1.06.2.1YesYesYesNo
Microsoft.WinJS.2.06.3.0NoYesNoYes

 

If there is a mismatch between the OS version the app applies to and the framework dependencies made, the test will fail. The test would also fail if the app refers to any preview versions of the framework dlls.

Inter-process Communication (IPC) verification

This test enforces the requirement that Windows Store apps do not communicate outside of the app container to Desktop components. Inter-process communication is intended for side-loaded apps only. Apps that specify the ActivatableClassAttribute with name equal to "DesktopApplicationPath" will fail this test.

Corrective action

Review the app's manifest against the requirements described in the Package metadata requirements.

Windows Security features test

Background

Changing the default Windows security protections can put customers at increased risk.

Test details

Tests the app's security by running the BinScope Binary Analyzer.

The BinScope Binary Analyzer tests examine the app's binary files to check for coding and building practices that make the app less vulnerable to attack or to being used as an attack vector.

The BinScope Binary Analyzer tests check for the correct use of the following security-related features.

BinScope Binary Analyzer tests

The BinScope Binary Analyzer tests examine the app's binary files to check for coding and building practices that make the app less vulnerable to attack or to being used as an attack vector.

The BinScope Binary Analyzer tests check for the correct use of these security-related features:

AllowPartiallyTrustedCallersAttribute

Windows App Certification Kit error message: APTCACheck Test failed

The AllowPartiallyTrustedCallersAttribute (APTCA) attribute enables access to fully trusted code from partially trusted code in signed assemblies. When you apply the APTCA attribute to an assembly, partially trusted callers can access that assembly for the life of the assembly, which can compromise security.

What to do if your app fails this test

Don't use the APTCA attribute on strong named assemblies unless your project requires it and the risks are well understood. In cases where it's required, make sure that all APIs are protected with appropriate code access security demands. APTCA has no effect when the assembly is a part of a Windows Store app.

Remarks

This test is performed only on managed code (C#, .NET, etc.).

/SafeSEH Exception Handling Protection

Windows App Certification Kit error message: SafeSEHCheck Test failed

An exception handler runs when the app encounters an exceptional condition, such as a divide-by-zero error. Because the address of the exception handler is stored on the stack when a function is called, it could be vulnerable to a buffer overflow attacker if some malicious software were to overwrite the stack.

What to do if your app fails this test

Enable the /SAFESEH option in the linker command when you build your app. This option is on by default in the Release configurations of Visual Studio. Verify this option is enabled in the build instructions for all executable modules in your app.

Remarks

The test is not performed on 64-bit binaries or ARM chipset binaries because they don't store exception handler addresses on the stack.

Data Execution Prevention

Windows App Certification Kit error message: NXCheck Test failed

This test verifies that an app doesn't run code that is stored in a data segment.

What to do if your app fails this test

Enable the /NXCOMPAT option in the linker command when you build your app. This option is on by default in linker versions that support Data Execution Prevention (DEP).

Remarks

We recommend that you test your apps on a DEP-capable CPU and fix any failures you find that result from DEP.

Address Space Layout Randomization

Windows App Certification Kit error message: DBCheck Test failed

Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) loads executable images into unpredictable locations in memory, which makes it harder for malicious software that expects a program to be loaded at a certain virtual address to operate predictably. Your app and all components that your app uses must support ASLR.

What to do if your app fails this test

Enable the /DYNAMICBASE option in the linker command when you build your app. Verify that all modules that your app uses also use this linker option.

Remarks

Normally, ASLR doesn't affect performance. But in some scenarios there is a slight performance improvement on 32-bit systems. It is possible that performance could degrade in a highly congested system that have many images loaded in many different memory locations.

This test is performed on only apps written in managed code, such as by using C# or .NET Framework.

Read/Write Shared PE Section

Windows App Certification Kit error message: SharedSectionsCheck Test failed.

Binary files with writable sections that are marked as shared are a security threat. Don't build apps with shared writable sections unless necessary. Use CreateFileMapping or MapViewOfFile to create a properly secured shared memory object.

What to do if your app fails this test

Remove any shared sections from the app and create shared memory objects by calling CreateFileMapping or MapViewOfFile with the proper security attributes and then rebuild your app.

Remarks

This test is performed only on apps written in unmanaged languages, such as by using C or C++.

AppContainerCheck

Windows App Certification Kit error message: AppContainerCheck Test failed.

The AppContainerCheck verifies that the appcontainer bit in the portable executable (PE) header of an executable binary is set. Windows Store apps must have the appcontainer bit set on all .exe files and all unmanaged DLLs to execute properly.

What to do if your app fails this test

If a native executable file fails the test, make sure that you used the latest compiler and linker to build the file and that you use the /appcontainer flag on the linker.

If a managed executable fails the test, make sure that you used the latest compiler and linker, such as Microsoft Visual Studio, to build the Windows Store app.

Remarks

This test is performed on all .exe files and on unmanaged DLLs.

ExecutableImportsCheck

Windows App Certification Kit error message: ExecutableImportsCheck Test failed.

A portable executable (PE) image fails this test if its import table has been placed in an executable code section. This can occur if you enabled .rdata merging for the PE image by setting the /merge flag of the Visual C++ linker as /merge:.rdata=.text.

What to do if your app fails this test

Don't merge the import table into an executable code section. Make sure that the /merge flag of the Visual C++ linker is not set to merge the “.rdata” section into a code section.

Remarks

This test is performed on all binary code except purely managed assemblies.

WXCheck

Windows App Certification Kit error message: WXCheck Test failed.

The check helps to ensure that a binary does not have any pages that are mapped as writable and executable. This can occur if the binary has a writable and executable section or if the binary’s SectionAlignment is less than PAGE_SIZE.

What to do if your app fails this test

Make sure that the binary does not have a writeable or executable section and that the binary's SectionAlignment value is at least equal to its PAGE_SIZE.

Remarks

This test is performed on all .exe files and on native, unmanaged DLLs.

An executable may have a writable and executable section if it has been built with Edit and Continue enabled (/ZI). Disabling Edit and Continue will cause the invalid section to not be present.

PAGE_SIZE is the default SectionAlignment for executables.

Banned File Analyzer

Windows App Certification Kit error message: Banned File Check test failed.

Windows Store apps should not contain certain files. These files have a newer version available that provides important security, reliability or other improvements. Microsoft blocks these files in the Windows App Certification Kit to ensure that all developers use a current version.

Test details

The Banned File Check in the Windows App Certification Kit currently checks for the following files:

Corrective actions

To correct this, use the latest version of the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps.

Private Code Signing

Tests for the existence of private code signing binaries within the app package.

Background

Private code signing files should be kept private as they may be used for malicious purposes in the event they are compromised.

Test details

Tests for files within the app package that have an extension of .pfx or.snk that would indicate that private signing keys were included.

Corrective actions

Remove any private code signing keys (e.g. .pfx and .snk files) from the package.

Supported Windows Store API test

Test the app for the use of any non-compliant APIs.

Background

Apps must use the APIs for Windows Store apps (Windows Runtime or supported Win32 APIs) to be certified for the Windows Store. This test also identifies situations where a managed binary takes a dependency on a function outside of the approved Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 profile.

Test details

  • Verifies that each binary within the app package doens't have a dependency on a Win32 API that is not supported for Windows Store app development by checking the import address table of the binary.
  • Verifies that each managed binary within the app package doesn't have a dependency on a function outside of the approved Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 profile.

Corrective actions

Make sure that the app was compiled as a release build and not a debug build.

Note  The debug build of an app will fail this test even if the app uses only APIs for Windows Store apps.

Review the error messages to identify the API the app uses that is not an API for Windows Store apps.

Note  C++ apps that are built in a debug configuration will fail this test even if the configuration only uses APIs from the Windows SDK for Windows Store apps. See, Alternatives to Windows APIs in Windows Store apps for more info.

Performance tests

The app must respond quickly to user interaction and system commands in order to present a fast and fluid user experience.

The characteristics of the computer on which the test is performed can influence the test results. The performance test thresholds for app certification are set such that low-power computers meet the customer’s expectation of a fast and fluid experience. To determine your app’s performance, we recommend that you test on a low-power computer, such as an Intel Atom processor-based computer with a screen resolution of 1366x768 (or higher) and a rotational hard drive (as opposed to a solid-state hard drive).

Bytecode generation

As a performance optimization to accelerate JavaScript execution time, JavaScript files ending in the .js extension generate bytecode when the app is deployed. This significantly improves startup and ongoing execution times for JavaScript operations.

Test Details

Checks the app deployment to verify that all .js files have been converted to bytecode.

Corrective Action

If this test fails, consider the following when addressing the issue:

  • Verify that event logging is enabled.
  • Verify that all JavaScript files are syntactically valid.
  • Confirm that all previous versions of the app are uninstalled.
  • Exclude identified files from the app package.

Optimized binding references

When using bindings, WinJS.Binding.optimizeBindingReferences should be set to true in order to optimize memory usage.

Test Details

Verify the value of WinJS.Binding.optimizeBindingReferences.

Corrective Action

Set WinJS.Binding.optimizeBindingReferences to true in the app JavaScript.

App manifest resources test

App resources validation

The app might not install if the strings or images declared in your app’s manifest are incorrect. If the app does install with these errors, your app’s logo or other images used by your app might not display correctly.

Test Details

Inspects the resources defined in the app manifest to make sure they are present and valid.

Corrective Action

Use the following table as guidance.

Error messageComments

The image {imageName} defines both Scale and TargetSize qualifiers; you can define only one qualifier at a time.

You can customize images for different resolutions.

In the actual message, {image name} contains the name of the image with the error.

Make sure that each image defines either Scale or TargetSize as the qualifier. For more info, see How to name resources using qualifiers.

The image {imageName} failed the size restrictions.

Ensure that all the app images adhere to the proper size restrictions.

In the actual message, {image name} contains the name of the image with the error.

For more info about your app's images and their sizes, see App images.

The image {imageName} is missing from the package.

A required image is missing.

In the actual message, {image name} contains the name of the image that is missing.

For more info about your app's images and their sizes, see App images.

The image {imageName} is not a valid image file.

Ensure that all the app images adhere to the proper file format type restrictions.

In the actual message, {image name} contains the name of the image that is not valid.

For more info about your app's images and their sizes, see App images.

The image "BadgeLogo" has an ABGR value {value} at position (x, y) that is not valid. The pixel must be white (##FFFFFF) or transparent (00######)

The badge logo is an image that appears next to the badge notification to identify the app on the lock screen. This image must be monochromatic (it can contain only white and transparent pixels).

In the actual message, {value} contains the color value in the image that is not valid.

For more info about your app's images and their sizes, see App images.

The image “BadgeLogo” has an ABGR value {value} at position (x, y) that is not valid for a high-contrast white image. The pixel must be (##2A2A2A) or darker, or transparent (00######).

The badge logo is an image that appears next to the badge notification to identify the app on the lock screen. Because the badge logo appears on a white background when in high-contrast white, it must be a dark version of the normal badge logo. In high-contrast white, the badge logo can only contain pixels that are darker than (##2A2A2A) or transparent.

In the actual message, {value} contains the color value in the image that is not valid.

For more info about your app's images and their sizes, see App images.

The image must define at least one variant without a TargetSize qualifier. It must define a Scale qualifier or leave Scale and TargetSize unspecified, which defaults to Scale-100.

For more info, see Guidelines for scaling to pixel density and How to name resources using qualifiers.

The package is missing a "resources.pri" file.

If you have localizable content in your app manifest, make sure that your app's package includes a valid resources.pri file.

The "resources.pri" file must contain a resource map with a name that matches the package name {packageFullName}

You can get this error if the manifest changed and the name of the resource map in resources.pri no longer matches the package name in the manifest.

In the actual message, {packageFullName} contains the package name that resources.pri must contain.

To fix this, you need to rebuild resources.pri and the easiest way to do that is by rebuilding the app's package.

The "resources.pri" file must not have AutoMerge enabled.

MakePRI.exe supports an option called AutoMerge. The default value of AutoMerge is off. When enabled, AutoMerge merges an app's language pack resources into a single resources.pri at runtime. We don't recommend this for Windows Store apps that you intend to distribute through the Windows Store. The resources.pri of a Windows Store app that is distributed through the Windows Store must be in the root of the app's package and contain all the language references that the app supports.

The string {string} failed the max length restriction of {number} characters.

Refer to the Package Metadata Requirements.

In the actual message, {string} is replaced by the string with the error and {number} contains the maximum length.

The string {string} must not have leading/trailing whitespace.

The schema for the elements in the app manifest don't allow leading or trailing white space characters.

In the actual message, {string} is replaced by the string with the error.

Make sure that none of the localized values of the manifest fields in resources.pri have leading or trailing white space characters.

The string must be non-empty (greater than zero in length)

For more info, see Package Metadata Requirements.

There is no default resource specified in the "resources.pri" file.

For more info, see Defining app resources.

There is no resource value specified in the “resources.pri" file.

Make sure that the app manifest has valid resources defined in resources.pri.

For more info, see Localizing the package manifest.

The image file <filename> must be smaller than 204800 bytes.**

Reduce the size of the indicated images.

The <filename> file must not contain a reverse map section.**

While the reverse map is generated during Visual Studio 'F5 debugging' when calling into makepri.exe, it can be removed by running makepri.exe without the /m parameter when generating a pri file.

** Indicates that a test was added in the Windows App Certification Kit 3.3 for Windows 8.1 and is only applicable when using the that version of the kit.

 

See App package resource validation for more info.

Branding validation

Windows Store apps are expected to be complete and fully functional. Apps using the default images (from templates or SDK samples) present a poor user experience and cannot be easily identified in the store catalog.

Test Details

The test will validate if the images used by the app are not default images either from SDK samples or from Visual Studio.

Corrective actions

Replace default images with something more distinct and representative of your app.

Debug configuration test

Test the app to make sure it is not a debug build.

Background

To be certified for the Windows Store, apps must not be compiled for debug and they must not reference debug versions of an executable file. In addition, you must build your code as optimized for your app to pass this test.

Test details

Test the app to make sure it is not a debug build and is not linked to any debug frameworks.

Corrective actions

  • Build the app as a release build before you submit it to the Windows Store.
  • Make sure that you have the correct version of .NET framework installed.
  • Make sure the app isn't linking to debug versions of a framework and that it is building with a release version. If this app contains .NET components, make sure that you have installed the correct version of the .NET framework.

File encoding test

UTF-8 file encoding

Background

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files must be encoded in UTF-8 form with a corresponding byte-order mark (BOM) to benefit from bytecode caching and avoid certain runtime error conditions.

Test details

Test the contents of app packages to make sure that they use the correct file encoding.

Corrective Action

Open the affected file and select Save As from the File menu in Visual Studio. Select the drop-down control next to the Save button and select Save with Encoding. From the Advanced save options dialog, choose the Unicode (UTF-8 with signature) option and click OK.

Direct3d feature level test

Direct3D feature level support

Tests Microsoft Direct3D apps to ensure that they work on all Windows 8 graphics hardware.

Background

Windows Store requires all applications using Direct3D to render properly on feature level 9_1. See Certification requirements for Windows apps for more info.

Test Details

The test will validate if the apps render accurately on feature level 9_1.

Corrective Action

Ensure that your app renders correctly on Direct3D feature level 9_1, even if you expect it to run at a higher feature level. See Developing for different Direct3D feature levels for more info.

Direct3D Trim after suspend

Note  This test is currently only available in the latest version of the Windows App Certification Kit provided with the Windows 8.1 SDK, and only applies to Windows Store apps developed for Windows 8.1.

Background

If the app does not call Trim on its Direct3D device, the app will not release memory allocated for its earlier 3D work. This increases the risk of apps being terminated due to system memory pressure.

Test Details

Checks apps for compliance with d3d requirements and ensures that C++/Windows Store apps are calling a new Trim API upon their Suspend callback.

Corrective Action

The app should call the Trim API on its IDXGIDevice3 interface anytime it is about to be suspended. For more information, see How to suspend an app (DirectX and C++).

App Capabilities test

Special use capabilities

Background

Special use capabilities are intended for very specific scenarios. Only company accounts are allowed to use these capabilities.

Test Details

Validate if the app is declaring any of the below capabilities:

  • EnterpriseAuthentication
  • SharedUserCertificates
  • DocumentsLibrary

If any of these capabilities are declared, the test will display a warning to the user.

Corrective Actions

Consider removing the special use capability if your app doesn't require it. Additionally, use of these capabilities are subject to additional on-boarding policy review.

Windows Runtime metadata validation

Background

Ensures that the Windows Runtime components that ship in an app conform to the Windows Runtime type system.

Test Details

Verifies that the .winmd files in the package conform to Windows Runtime rules.

Corrective Actions

  • ExclusiveTo attribute test: Ensure that Windows Runtime classes don't implement interfaces that are marked as ExclusiveTo another class.
  • Type location test: Ensure that the metadata for all Windows Runtime types is located in the winmd file that has the longest namespace-matching name in the app package.
  • Type name case-sensitivity test: Ensure that all Windows Runtime types have unique, case-insensitive names within your app package. Also ensure that no Windows Runtime type name is also used as a namespace name within your app package.
  • Type name correctness test: Ensure there are no Windows Runtime types in the global namespace or in the Windows top-level namespace.
  • General metadata correctness test: Ensure that the compiler you are using to generate your Windows Runtime types is up to date with the Windows Runtime specifications.
  • Properties test: ensure that all properties on a Windows Runtime class have a get method (set methods are optional). Ensure that the type of the get method return value matches the type of the set method input parameter, for all properties on Windows Runtime types.

Package Sanity tests

Platform appropriate files test

Note  This test is currently only available in the latest version of the Windows App Certification Kit provided with the Windows 8.1 SDK.

Apps that install mixed binaries may crash or not run correctly depending upon the user’s processor architecture.

Background

This test validates the binaries in an app package for architecture conflicts. An app package should not include binaries that can't be used on the processor architecture specified in the manifest. Including unsupported binaries can lead to your app crashing or an unnecessary increase in the app package size.

Test Details

Validates that each file's “bitness” in the PE header is appropriate when cross-referenced with the app package processor architecture declaration

Corrective Action

Follow these guidelines to ensure that your app package only contains files supported by the architecture specified in the app manifest:

  • If the Target Processor Architecture for your app is Neutral processor Type, the app package cannot contain x86, x64, or ARM binary or image type files.

  • If the Target Processor Architecture for your app is x86 processor type, the app package must only contain x86 binary or image type files. If the package contains x64 or ARM binary or image types, it will fail the test.

  • If the Target Processor Architecture for your app is x64 processor type, the app package must contain x64 binary or image type files. Note that in this case the package can also include x86 files, but the primary app experience should utilize the x64 binary.

    However, if the package contains ARM binary or image type files, or only contains x86 binaries or image type files, it will fail the test.

  • If the Target Processor Architecture for your app is ARM processor type, the app package must only contain ARM binary or image type files. If the package contains x64 or x86 binary or image type files, it will fail the test.

Supported Directory Structure test

Note  This test is currently only available in the latest version of the Windows App Certification Kit provided with the Windows 8.1 SDK.

Validates that applications are not creating subdirectories as part of installation that are longer than MAX_PATH.

Background

OS components (including Trident, WWAHost, etc.) are internally limited to MAX_PATH for file system paths and will not work correctly for longer paths.

Test Details

Verifies that no path within the app install directory exceeds MAX_PATH.

Corrective Action

Use a shorter directory structure, and or file name.

Resource Usage test

WinJS Background Task test

WinJS background task test ensures that JavaScript apps have the proper close statements so apps don’t consume battery.

Background

Apps that have JavaScript background tasks need to call Close() as the last statement in their background task. Apps that do not do this could keep the system from returning to connected standby mode and result in draining the battery.

Test Details

If the app does not have a background task file specified in the manifest, the test will pass. Otherwise the test will parse the JavaScript background task file that is specified in the app package, and look for a Close() statement. If found, the test will pass; otherwise the test will fail.

Corrective Action

Update the background JavaScript code to call Close() correctly.

Remarks

These are the Visual C library changes for Windows 8.1.

  • assert() will cause a pop-up message box only in debug versions of the new C++ runtime. Both still break when a debugger is attached, causing issues during Windows App Certification Kit testing for the Windows Store C runtime.
  • exit() and std::exit() may no longer exit an app. If these are called in the activation handler they will throw runtime exceptions.
  • OpenMP removed support for environment variables and displays errors to the console, causing issues during Windows App Certification Kit testing for the Windows Store C runtime.

 

 

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