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How To: Build Claims-Aware ASP.NET Web Forms Application Using WIF

.NET Framework 4.5

  • Microsoft® Windows® Identity Foundation (WIF)

  • ASP.NET® Web Forms

This How-To provides detailed step-by-step procedures for creating simple claims-aware ASP.NET Web Forms application. It also provides instructions for how to test the simple claims-aware ASP.NET Web Forms application for successful implementation of federated authentication. This How-To does not have detailed instructions for creating a Security Token Service (STS), and assumes you have already configured an STS.

  • Objectives

  • Summary of Steps

  • Step 1 – Create a Simple ASP.NET Web Forms Application

  • Step 2 – Configure ASP.NET Web Forms Application for Claims-Based Authentication

  • Step 3 – Test Your Solution

  • Configure ASP.NET Web Forms application for claims-based authentication

  • Test successful claims-aware ASP.NET Web Forms application

  • Step 1 – Create Simple ASP.NET Web Forms Application

  • Step 2 – Configure ASP.NET Web Forms Application for Federated Authentication

  • Step 3 – Test Your Solution

In this step, you will create a new ASP.NET Web Forms application.

To create a simple ASP.NET application

  1. Start Visual Studio and click File, New, and then Project.

  2. In the New Project window, click ASP.NET Web Forms Application.

  3. In Name, enter TestApp and press OK.

In this step you will add configuration entries to the Web.config configuration file of your ASP.NET Web Forms application to make it claims-aware.

To configure ASP.NET application for claims-based authentication

  1. Add the following configuration section entries to the Web.config configuration file immediately after the <configuration> opening element:

    <configSections>
      <section name="system.identityModel" type="System.IdentityModel.Configuration.SystemIdentityModelSection, System.IdentityModel, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=B77A5C561934E089" />
      <section name="system.identityModel.services" type="System.IdentityModel.Services.Configuration.SystemIdentityModelServicesSection, System.IdentityModel.Services, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=B77A5C561934E089" />
    </configSections>
    
  2. Add a <location> element that enables access to the application’s federation metadata:

    <location path="FederationMetadata">
      <system.web>
        <authorization>
          <allow users="*" />
        </authorization>
      </system.web>
    </location>
    
  3. Add the following configuration entries within the <system.web> elements to deny users, disable native authentication, and enable WIF to manage authentication.

    <authorization>
      <deny users="?" />
    </authorization>
    <authentication mode="None" />
    
  4. Add a <system.webServer> element that defines the modules for federated authentication. Note that the PublicKeyToken attribute must be the same as the PublicKeyToken attribute for the <configSections> entries added earlier:

    <system.webServer>
      <modules>
        <add name="WSFederationAuthenticationModule" type="System.IdentityModel.Services.WSFederationAuthenticationModule, System.IdentityModel.Services, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" preCondition="managedHandler" />
        <add name="SessionAuthenticationModule" type="System.IdentityModel.Services.SessionAuthenticationModule, System.IdentityModel.Services, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" preCondition="managedHandler" />
      </modules>
    </system.webServer>
    
  5. Add the following Windows Identity Foundation related configuration entries and ensure that your ASP.NET application’s URL and port number match the values in the <audienceUris> entry, realm attribute of the <wsFederation> element, and the reply attribute of the <wsFederation> element. Also ensure that the issuer value fits your Security Token Service (STS) URL.

    <system.identityModel>
        <identityConfiguration>
            <audienceUris>
                <add value="http://localhost:28503/" />
            </audienceUris>
            <issuerNameRegistry type="System.IdentityModel.Tokens.ConfigurationBasedIssuerNameRegistry, System.IdentityModel, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
                <trustedIssuers>
                    <add thumbprint="1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1234" name="YourSTSName" />
                </trustedIssuers> 
            </issuerNameRegistry>
            <certificateValidation certificateValidationMode="None" />
        </identityConfiguration>
    </system.identityModel>
    <system.identityModel.services>
        <federationConfiguration>
            <cookieHandler requireSsl="false" />
            <wsFederation passiveRedirectEnabled="true" issuer="http://localhost:13922/wsFederationSTS/Issue" realm="http://localhost:28503/" reply="http://localhost:28503/" requireHttps="false" />
        </federationConfiguration>
    </system.identityModel.services>
    
  6. Add reference to the [System.IdentityModel] assembly.

  7. Compile the solution to make sure there are errors.

In this step you will test your ASP.NET Web Forms application configured for claims-based authentication. To perform a basic test, you will add code that displays claims in the token issued by the Security Token Service (STS).

To test your ASP.NET Web Form application for claims-based authentication

  1. Open the Default.aspx file under the TestApp project and replace its existing markup with the following markup:

    %@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>
    
    <!DOCTYPE html>
    
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head id="Head1" runat="server">
        <title></title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <h1><asp:label ID="signedIn" runat="server" /></h1>
        <asp:label ID="claimType" runat="server" />
        <asp:label ID="claimValue" runat="server" />
        <asp:label ID="claimValueType" runat="server" />
        <asp:label ID="claimSubjectName" runat="server" />
        <asp:label ID="claimIssuer" runat="server" />
    </body>
    </html>
    
  2. Save Default.aspx, and then open its code behind file named Default.aspx.cs.

    Note Note

    Default.aspx.cs may be hidden beneath Default.aspx in Solution Explorer. If Default.aspx.cs is not visible, expand Default.aspx by clicking on the triangle next to it.

  3. Replace the existing code in the Page_Load method of Default.aspx.cs with the following code:

    using System;
    using System.IdentityModel;
    using System.Security.Claims;
    using System.Threading;
    using System.Web.UI;
    
    namespace TestApp
    {
        public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
        {
            protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
            {
                ClaimsPrincipal claimsPrincipal = Thread.CurrentPrincipal as ClaimsPrincipal;
    
                if (claimsPrincipal != null)
                {
                    signedIn.Text = "You are signed in.";
    
                    foreach (Claim claim in claimsPrincipal.Claims)
                    {
                        claimType.Text = claim.Type;
                        claimValue.Text = claim.Value;
                        claimValueType.Text = claim.ValueType;
                        claimSubjectName.Text = claim.Subject.Name;
                        claimIssuer.Text = claim.Issuer;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    signedIn.Text = "You are not signed in.";
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
  4. Save Default.aspx.cs, and build the solution.

  5. Run the solution by pressing the F5 key.

  6. You should be presented with the page that displays the claims in the token that was issued to you by the Security Token Service.

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