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Controlling CWEs and Notifications in Lync 2010 Contextual Conversations: Introduction (Part 1 of 3)

Summary:   This article describes how to add three registry entries in various combinations to control the display of the Conversation Window Extension (CWE) and the start link notification in a Microsoft Lync 2010 contextual conversation.

Applies to:   Microsoft Lync 2010 | Microsoft Lync 2010 SDK

Published:   January 2012 | Provided by:   John Clarkson, Microsoft | About the Author

Contents

Lync contextual applications require registration. For more information, see Register Contextual Conversation Packages in Lync 2010. The main purpose of the Path, InternalURL, and ExternalURL entries is to specify the application path or URL. However, these entries can also be used to control whether the CWE and the start link notification display in a contextual conversation.

Figure 1. Conversation Window Extension (CWE)

CWE

Figure 2. Start link notification

launch link

The following table describes the three registry entries. Add the context application GUID as a key under either of these two paths:

  • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Communicator\ContextPackages

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Communicator\ContextPackages

Registry entry

Description

Path

Specifies application path for desktop applications. If it is included in application registration then start link notifications appear in the conversation window. If it is absent, start link notifications do not appear.

InternalURL

Specifies application URL for client endpoints within the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 domain. If it is included in application registration then the application starts in the CWE. If it is absent, the application starts in its own window.

ExternalURL

Specifies application URL for client endpoints outside the Lync Server 2010 domain. If it is included in application registration then the application starts in the CWE. If it is absent, the application starts in its own window.

John Clarkson is a programming writer with the Microsoft Lync product team.

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