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base (C# Reference)

The base keyword is used to access members of the base class from within a derived class:

  • Call a method on the base class that has been overridden by another method.

  • Specify which base-class constructor should be called when creating instances of the derived class.

A base class access is permitted only in a constructor, an instance method, or an instance property accessor.

It is an error to use the base keyword from within a static method.

The base class that is accessed is the base class specified in the class declaration. For example, if you specify class ClassB : ClassA, the members of ClassA are accessed from ClassB, regardless of the base class of ClassA.

In this example, both the base class, Person, and the derived class, Employee, have a method named Getinfo. By using the base keyword, it is possible to call the Getinfo method on the base class, from within the derived class.

    public class Person
    {
        protected string ssn = "444-55-6666";
        protected string name = "John L. Malgraine";

        public virtual void GetInfo()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}", name);
            Console.WriteLine("SSN: {0}", ssn);
        }
    }
    class Employee : Person
    {
        public string id = "ABC567EFG";
        public override void GetInfo()
        {
            // Calling the base class GetInfo method: 
            base.GetInfo();
            Console.WriteLine("Employee ID: {0}", id);
        }
    }

    class TestClass
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Employee E = new Employee();
            E.GetInfo();
        }
    }
    /*
    Output
    Name: John L. Malgraine
    SSN: 444-55-6666
    Employee ID: ABC567EFG
    */

For additional examples, see new, virtual, and override.

This example shows how to specify the base-class constructor called when creating instances of a derived class.

public class BaseClass
{
    int num;

    public BaseClass()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("in BaseClass()");
    }

    public BaseClass(int i)
    {
        num = i;
        Console.WriteLine("in BaseClass(int i)");
    }

    public int GetNum()
    {
        return num;
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    // This constructor will call BaseClass.BaseClass() 
    public DerivedClass() : base()
    {
    }

    // This constructor will call BaseClass.BaseClass(int i) 
    public DerivedClass(int i) : base(i)
    {
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        DerivedClass md = new DerivedClass();
        DerivedClass md1 = new DerivedClass(1);
    }
}
/*
Output:
in BaseClass()
in BaseClass(int i)
*/

For more information, see the C# Language Specification. The language specification is the definitive source for C# syntax and usage.

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