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Compiler Error C2660

'function' : function does not take number parameters

The function is called with an incorrect number of parameters.

C2660 can occur if you accidentally call a Windows API function rather than an MFC member function of the same name. To solve this problem:

  • Adjust the function call to conform to the format of the member function call.

  • Use the scope resolution operator (::) to tell the compiler to seek the function name in the global name space.

The following sample generates C2660.

// C2660.cpp
void func( int, int ) {}

int main() {
   func( 1 );   // C2660 func( int ) not declared
   func( 1, 0 );   // OK
}

C2660 can also occur if you attempt to directly call the Dispose method of a managed type. For more information, see Destructors and Finalizers. The following sample generates C2660.

// C2660_a.cpp
// compile with: /clr
using namespace System;
using namespace System::Threading;

void CheckStatus( Object^ stateInfo ) {}

int main() {
   ManualResetEvent^ event = gcnew ManualResetEvent( false );   
   TimerCallback^ timerDelegate = gcnew TimerCallback( &CheckStatus );
   Timer^ stateTimer = gcnew Timer( timerDelegate, event, 1000, 250 );

   stateTimer->Dispose();   // C2660
   stateTimer->~Timer();   // OK
}

C2660 will occur if a derived class hides a function.

// C2660b.cpp
// C2660 expected
#include <stdio.h>

class f {
public:
   void bar() {
      printf_s("in f::bar\n");
    }
};

class f2 : public f {
public:
   void bar(int i){printf("in f2::bar\n");}
   // Uncomment the following line to resolve.
   // using f::bar;   // - using declaration added
   // or
   // void bar(){__super::bar();}
};

int main() {
   f2 fObject;
   fObject.bar();
}

C2660 can occur if you invoke an indexed property incorrectly.

// C2660c.cpp
// compile with: /clr
ref class X {
   double d;
public:
   X() : d(1.9) {}
   property double MyProp[] {
      double get(int i) {
         return d;
      }
   }   // end MyProp definition
};

int main() {
   X ^ MyX = gcnew X();
   System::Console::WriteLine(MyX->MyProp(1));   // C2660
   System::Console::WriteLine(MyX->MyProp[1]);   // OK
}

C2660 can occur if you invoke an indexed property incorrectly.

// C2660d.cpp
// compile with: /clr
ref class A{
public:
   property int default[int,int] {
      int get(int a, int b) {
         return a + b;
      }
   }
};

int main() {
   A^ a = gcnew A;
   int x = a[3][5];   // C2660
   int x2 = a[3,5];   // OK
}

C2660 can occur if you define a new operator in a template class, but where the new operator creates an object whose type is other than the enclosing type.

// C2660e.cpp
// compile with: /c
#include <malloc.h>

template <class T> class CA {
private:
    static T** line;
   void* operator new (size_t, int i) { 
      return 0;
   }
   void operator delete(void* pMem, int i) {
      free(pMem);
   }

public:
   CA () { new (1) T(); }   // C2660
   // try the following line instead
   // CA () { new (1) CA<int>(); }
};

typedef CA <int> int_CA;

void AAA() {
   int_CA  list;
}
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