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Configuring .NET-Based Components for Registration-Free Activation

Registration-free activation for .NET-based components is only slightly more complicated than it is for COM components. The setup requires two manifests:

  • COM applications must have a Win32-style application manifest to identify the managed component.
  • .NET-based components must have a component manifest for activation information needed at run time.

This topic describes how to associate an application manifest with an application; associate a component manifest with a component; and embed a component manifest in an assembly.

To create an application manifest

  1. Using an XML editor, create (or modify) the application manifest owned by the COM application that is interoperating with one or more managed components.
  2. Insert the following standard header at the beginning of the file:
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
    

    For information about manifest elements and their attributes, search for "Application Manifests Reference" in the MSDN Library.

  3. Identify the owner of the manifest. In the following example, myComApp version 1 owns the manifest file.
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
      <assemblyIdentity type="win32" 
                        name="myOrganization.myDivision.myComApp" 
                        version="1.0.0.0" 
                        processorArchitecture="x86" 
      />
    
  4. Identify dependent assemblies. In the following example, myComApp depends on myManagedComp.
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
      <assemblyIdentity type="win32" 
                        name="myOrganization.myDivision.myComApp" 
                        version="1.0.0.0" 
                        processorArchitecture="x86" 
                        publicKeyToken="8275b28176rcbbef"
      />
      <dependency>
        <dependentAssembly>
          <assemblyIdentity type="win32" 
                        name="myOrganization.myDivision.myManagedComp" 
                        version="6.0.0.0" 
                        processorArchitecture="X86" 
                        publicKeyToken="8275b28176rcbbef"
                        language="*"
          />
        </dependentAssembly>
      </dependency>
    </assembly>
    
  5. Save and name the manifest file. The name of an application manifest is the name of the assembly executable followed by the .manifest extension. For example, the application manifest file name for myComApp.exe is myComApp.exe.manifest.

You can install an application manifest in the same directory as the COM application. Alternatively, you can add it as a resource to the application's .exe file. For additional information, search for "Side-by-side Assemblies" in the MSDN Library.

To create a component manifest

  1. Using an XML editor, create a component manifest to describe the managed assembly.
  2. Insert the following standard header at the beginning of the file:
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
    
  3. Identify the owner of the file. The <assemblyIdentity> element of the <dependentAssembly> element in application manifest file must match the one in the component manifest. In the following example, myManagedComp version 1.2.3.4 owns the manifest file.
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
           <assemblyIdentity
                        name="myOrganization.myDivision.myManagedComp"
                        version="1.2.3.4" />
                        publicKeyToken="8275b28176rcbbef"
    
  4. Identify each class in the assembly. Use the <clrClass> element to uniquely identify each class in the managed assembly. The element, which is a subelement of the <assembly> element, has the attributes described in the following table.
    Attribute Description Required
    clsid The identifier that specifies the class to be activated. Yes
    description A string that informs the user about the component. An empty string is the default. No
    name A string that represents the managed class. Yes
    progid The identifier to be used for late-bound activation. No
    threadingModel The COM threading model. "Both" is the default value. No
    runtimeVersion This attribute is ignored. If the runtime is not already loaded, the highest version is loaded before the class is activated. Otherwise, the currently loaded version is used. No
    tlbid The identifier of the type library that contains type information about the class. No

    All attribute tags are case-sensitive. You can obtain CLSIDs, ProgIDs, threading models, and the runtime version by viewing the exported type library for the assembly with the OLE/COM ObjectViewer (Oleview.exe).

    The following component manifest identifies a single class with two methods.

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
           <assemblyIdentity
                        name="myOrganization.myDivision.myManagedComp"
                        version="1.2.3.4" />
                        publicKeyToken="8275b28176rcbbef"
           <clrClass
                        clsid="{65722BE6-3449-4628-ABD3-74B6864F9739}"
                        progid="myManagedComp.testClass1"
                        threadingModel="Both"
                        name="myManagedComp.testClass1"
                        runtimeVersion="v1.0.3705">
           </clrClass>
           <clrClass
                        clsid="{367221D6-3559-3328-ABD3-45B6825F9732}"
                        progid="myManagedComp.testClass2"
                        threadingModel="Both"
                        name="myManagedComp.testClass2"
                        runtimeVersion="v1.0.3705">
           </clrClass>
           <file name="MyManagedComp.dll">
           </file>
    </assembly>
    
  5. Save and name the manifest file. The name of a component manifest is the name of the assembly library followed by the .manifest extension. For example, the myManagedComp.dll is myManagedComp.manifest.

You must embed the component manifest as a resource in the assembly.

To embed a component manifest in a managed assembly

  1. Create a resource script that contains the following statement:

    RT_MANIFEST 1 myManagedComp.manifest

    In this statement, myManagedComp.manifest is the name of the component manifest being embedded. For this example, the script file name is myresource.rc.

  2. Compile the script using the Microsoft Windows Resource Compiler (Rc.exe). At the command prompt, type the following command:

    rc myresource.rc

    Rc.exe produces the myresource.res resource file.

  3. Compile the assembly's source file again and specify the resource file by using the /win32res option:
    /win32res:myresource.res
    

    Again, myresource.res is the name of the resource file containing embedded resource.

See Also

Registration-Free COM Interop | Requirements for Registration-Free COM Interop | Configuring COM Components for Registration-Free Activation

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