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Transform an object in simulated 3D space

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You can transform an object in a projection transformation that creates the appearance of rotating the object in 3D space.

tip noteTip

Microsoft Expression Blend comes with a sample that illustrates projection transformation in code. To open the sample in Expression Blend, click Welcome Screen on the Help menu, click the Samples tab, and then click Zune3D.

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To move the center point of an object in simulated 3D space

The projection center point determines the location in simulated 3D space around which an object is rotated or offset. When the values are 0, 0, 0, the center point is the upper-left corner of the bounding box of the object. When the values are 1, 1, 0, the center point is the lower-right corner of the bounding box of the object. Values greater than 1 put the center point beyond the bounding box.

  1. Select the object that you want to rotate in the Objects and Timeline panel or on the artboard.

  2. In the Properties panel, in the Transform category, under Projection, click the Center of Rotation tab Ee341417.49772b0c-095e-450b-967e-75dc1858966f(en-us,Expression.40).png.

  3. Change the values for the X, Y, and Z properties.

    NoteNote

    The Z property affects only global offsets.

To rotate an object in simulated 3D space

The X, Y, and Z rotation properties refer to the axis and center points around which the rotation will occur.

  1. Select the object that you want to rotate in the Objects and Timeline panel or on the artboard.

  2. In the Properties panel, in the Transform category, under Projection, click the Rotation tab Ee341417.321b430b-5c8e-47dc-93f8-0e85ac32cca5(en-us,Expression.40).png.

  3. Change the values for the X, Y, and Z properties, or drag the projection ball to change the values.

    Using the projection ball to rotate an object

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To offset an object in simulated 3D space relative to the screen

The global offset determines how an object is translated relative to the planes of the screen. For example, when you change the X property on the Global Offset tab, you move the object right and left along the X axis of the screen, regardless of how the projection of the object is rotated.

  1. Select the object that you want to rotate in the Objects and Timeline panel or on the artboard.

  2. In the Properties panel, in the Transform category, under Projection, click the Global Offset tab Ee341417.b4dc507f-1887-4dfa-ac1a-96106e083251(en-us,Expression.40).png.

  3. Change the values for the X, Y, and Z properties.

    Changing the global offset

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To offset an object in simulated 3D space relative to its origin

The local offset determines how an object is translated relative to the planes of the object. For example, if you change the Y property on the Rotation tab to 30 degrees, you change the plane of the object so that it appears to tip forward on the right. If you then change the value of the X property on the Local Offset tab, the object will appear to move towards you to the right or away from you to the left.

  1. Select the object that you want to rotate in the Objects and Timeline panel or on the artboard.

  2. In the Properties panel, in the Transform category, under Projection, click the Local Offset tab Ee341417.8fef46b2-feb1-4c7b-8dd7-563dd998b6a7(en-us,Expression.40).png.

    Changing the local offset

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To transform the object in 2D space

After you begin to modify Projection properties, the artboard handles for 2D transformation are turned off. To bring back the 2D transformation handles, turn off projection.

  • On the View menu, click Apply Projections to clear the selection.

See also

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