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7 Appendix B: Product Behavior

The information in this specification is applicable to the following Microsoft products or supplemental software. References to product versions include released service packs:

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

  • Windows 8.1 operating system

Exceptions, if any, are noted below. If a service pack or Quick Fix Engineering (QFE) number appears with the product version, behavior changed in that service pack or QFE. The new behavior also applies to subsequent service packs of the product unless otherwise specified. If a product edition appears with the product version, behavior is different in that product edition.

Unless otherwise specified, any statement of optional behavior in this specification that is prescribed using the terms SHOULD or SHOULD NOT implies product behavior in accordance with the SHOULD or SHOULD NOT prescription. Unless otherwise specified, the term MAY implies that the product does not follow the prescription.

<1> Section 2.1: Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013 use both HTTP and HTTPS as the transport for Autodiscover command. Exchange 2007 SP1 only uses HTTPS as the transport for Autodiscover command.

<2> Section 2.2.2.1: When sending an Autodiscover command request to Exchange 2007, the Content-Type header accepts the following values: "text/html" or "text/xml".

<3> Section 2.2.2.10: In Exchange 2007, the MeetingResponse command is used to accept, tentatively accept, or decline a meeting request only in the user's Inbox folder.

<4> Section 2.2.2.17: Sending the DeviceInformation parameters immediately after the client has been provisioned, and before the FolderSync command is not recommended for Exchange 2007.

<5> Section 2.2.3.38: In Exchange 2007, the Culture element always returns "en:en", regardless of the culture that is sent by the client.

<6> Section 2.2.3.58.1: Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013 use 42 days; Exchange 2007 SP1 uses 62 days.

<7> Section 2.2.3.79.1: In Microsoft products, the valid values for the HeartbeatInterval element are 60 through 3540 seconds (59 minutes) by default. The configurable minimum value is 1 second and the configurable maximum value is 3540 seconds (59 minutes).

<8> Section 2.2.3.79.2: In Microsoft products, the valid values for the HeartbeatInterval element are 60 through 3540 seconds (59 minutes) by default. The configurable minimum value is 1 second and the configurable maximum value is 3540 seconds (59 minutes).

<9> Section 2.2.3.83.1: Exchange 2007 SP1 and Windows 8.1 do not return Status element value of 2 if the request includes the InstanceId element when a non-supporting protocol version is used.

<10> Section 2.2.3.106: In Exchange 2007, the server sends Sync response messages containing the MoreAvailable element and between zero (0) and WindowSize schema changes when it encounters elements external to the protocol.

<11> Section 2.2.3.113: Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010, and Exchange 2013 require that the reply message for unknown external and known external audiences be the same.

<12> Section 2.2.3.117: Windows 8.1 uses the value "WINDOWS" for the OS element.

<13> Section 2.2.3.124: The initial release version of Exchange 2010 requires the PhoneNumber element to have a value when the EnableOutboundSMS element, as specified in section 2.2.3.57, is set to 1. Under these conditions, if the PhoneNumber element does not have a value, the server returns a value of 5 in the Status element, as specified in section 2.2.3.162.14. Exchange 2010 SP1 and Exchange 2013 do not require the PhoneNumber element to have a value when the EnableOutboundSMS element is set to 1.

<14> Section 2.2.3.152: Sending the DeviceInformation parameters immediately after the client has been provisioned, and before the FolderSync command is not recommended for Exchange 2007.

<15> Section 2.2.3.162.7: Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010 SP1, and Exchange 2013 do not return a value of 155 in the Status element.

<16> Section 2.2.3.162.11: The default value of the maximum number is 100 on Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013.

<17> Section 2.2.3.168: Exchange 2007 SP1 and Exchange 2010 do not limit the number of To elements in command requests. Update Rollup 6 for Exchange 2010 SP2 and Exchange 2013 do limit the number of To elements in command requests.

<18> Section 2.2.3.168: Some fields that are indexed by using ANR in Active Directory by default in Exchange 2007 are as follows: Name, Alias, Email, Office. The ANR property set that can be indexed is definable by the administrator and can be extended to include other fields.

<19> Section 2.2.3.168: The default value of the maximum number is 100 on Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013.

<20> Section 3.1.5.1: Windows 8.1 does not issue a Provision command as the first command.

<21> Section 3.1.5.2: Windows 8.1 sends the settings:DeviceInformation element after the FolderSync command.

<22> Section 3.1.5.2: Sending the settings:DeviceInformation parameters immediately after the client has been provisioned and before the FolderSync command is not recommended for Exchange 2007.

<23> Section 3.1.5.3: Windows 8.1 does not restart the synchronization process with a synchronization key of 0 when the FolderSync response contains a Status element value of 9.

<24> Section 3.1.5.6: Exchange 2007 SP1 and Exchange 2010 do not return substitute meeting invitation email messages.

<25> Section 3.1.5.6: Exchange 2010 returns the meeting request with the email2:MeetingMessageType element ([MS-ASEMAIL] section 2.2.2.45) set to 6.

<26> Section 3.1.5.9: Exchange 2007 SP1 and Exchange 2010 do not limit the number of elements in command requests. Update Rollup 6 for Exchange 2010 SP2 and Exchange 2013 do limit the number of elements in command requests.

<27> Section 3.1.5.9: Exchange 2007 SP1 and Exchange 2010 do not limit the number of elements in command requests. Update Rollup 6 for Exchange 2010 SP2 and Exchange 2013 use the specified limit values by default but can be configured to use different values.

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