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Migrating to Exchange Online and Exchange 2013 technologies

Last modified: August 25, 2014

Applies to: EWS Managed API | Exchange Online | Exchange Server 2007 | Exchange Server 2010 | Exchange Server 2013 | Office 365

In this article
Determine whether your development technology is available in current versions of Exchange
Choose a development technology to migrate to
Additional resources

If you're migrating from an earlier version of Exchange, use the information in this article to find out which development technologies are supported in current product versions, and which technology to migrate to.

Use the following table to determine whether a technology is supported in Exchange Online or Exchange 2013. If the technology is not supported, see Choose a development technology to migrate to.

Exchange development technologies and product versions

Technology

Office 365 and Exchange Online

Exchange 2013

Exchange 2010

Exchange 2007

Office 365 APIs Preview

X

EWS Managed API

X

X

X

X

Exchange Web Services (EWS)

X

X

X

X

Mail apps for Outlook

X

X

Outlook Object Model (OOM)

X

X

X

X

Exchange Management Shell

X

X

X

X

Backup and restore

X

X

X

Transport agents

X

X

X

Active Directory Services Interface (ADSI)

X

Collaborative Data Objects for Exchange (CDOEX)

X

Collaborative Data Objects for Windows 2000 (CDOSYS)

X

Exchange OLE DB Provider (EXOLEDB)

X

Exchange Store Event Sinks

X

Incremental Change Synchronization (ICS)

X

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)

X

Messaging API (MAPI)

X

X

X

X

Outlook Web App customization

X

Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV)

X

If the technology your application uses is not supported or deemphasized in Exchange Online or Exchange 2013, use the following table to decide which technology to migrate to.

Recommended technology migration paths

Technology

Supported in Office 365, Exchange Online, and Exchange 2013?

Migrate to

More info

ADSI

Yes, but deemphasized

Exchange Management Shell

None.

CDOEX

No

EWS Managed API or EWS

The EWS Managed API and EWS can access the same Exchange store that CDOEX provides. Unlike client applications built by using CDOEX, you can run EWS applications on a local or remote computer.

CDOEXM

No

Exchange Management Shell

Exchange Management Shell commands control Exchange servers, storage groups, databases, and users more simply than the corresponding CDOEXM APIs. Plus, you can easily migrate your CDOEXM applications to Exchange Management Shell commands.

CDOSYS

No

Transport agents

Use transport agents for notification-based applications that work with versions of Exchange starting with Exchange 2010.

CDOSYS is included in current versions of Windows. The functionality in CDOSYS is available in the .NET Framework.

CDOWF

No

Windows Workflow Foundation (WWF) or BizTalk Server

You can use WWF to create advanced workflow applications that work with Exchange 2007. For more complicated workflow systems, use BizTalk Server.

ExOLEDB

No

EWS Managed API or EWS

The EWS Managed API and EWS provide the same access to the Exchange store that ExOLEDB provides. Unlike client applications built by using ExOLEDB, You can run EWS applications on a local or remote computer.

ICS

Yes, but deemphasized

EWS Managed API or EWS

You can use the EWS Managed API or EWS to subscribe to notifications and synchronize mailbox data.

LDAP

Yes, but deemphasized

Exchange Management Shell

None.

MAPI

Yes, but deemphasized

Office 365 APIs Preview , EWS Managed API, EWS

Although MAPI is currently a supported development technology, you will eventually have to redesign your MAPI applications to use a newer technology.

If your MAPI application is performing simple read, write, and update operations on mail, calendar, or contact objects, and targets Office 365, you can use the Office 365 REST APIs Preview for mail, calendars, and contacts. If you are targeting Exchange on-premises and you need to access all the properties that MAPI can access, you use the EWS Managed API or EWS and either schematized properties or extended properties.

Note Note

The ExtendedPropertyDefinition class provides access to MAPI from the EWS Managed API, and the ExtendedFieldURI element provides access to MAPI properties from EWS.

Outlook Web App customization

No

Mail apps

None.

Store event sinks

No

EWS Managed API or EWS

You can use the EWS Managed API or EWS to subscribe to notifications and synchronize mailbox data. The notifications in EWS provide the same access to the Exchange store that store event sinks provide. You can use Visual Studio tools to streamline the development of store event–aware client applications that use EWS.

Streaming backup and restore

No

Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) writer

None.

WebDAV

No

Office 365 APIs Preview , EWS Managed API, or EWS

If your WebDAV application is performing simple read, write, and update operations on mail, calendar, or contact objects, and you will be targeting Office 365, use the Office 365 REST APIs Preview for mail, calendars, and contacts. Otherwise, if you are targeting Exchange on-premises and you need access to the same properties in the Exchange store that WebDAV provides, use the EWS Managed API or EWS.

WebDAV notifications

No

EWS Managed API or EWS

You can use the EWS Managed API or EWS to subscribe to notifications.

Web forms

No

ASP.NET

Switch to ASP.NET and update applications to access mailbox and server information by using EWS.

WMI providers

No

Exchange Management Shell

None.

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