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1.1 Glossary

The following terms are specific to this document:

alternate sort: Specifies an alternate collation for a language that has multiple methods for sorting data. For example, German has both "Dictionary" and "Phone Book" sorts. "Dictionary" sorting (de-DE) is the default for German, but developers can specify the alternate "Phone Book" sort (de-DE_phoneb) explicitly.

BIG5: Believed to be derived from either the five companies (Acer, MiTAC, JiaJia, Zero One, and FIC) that developed this standard or from the intended development and support of five major software packages from these companies. The original character set is sorted first by usage frequency, second by stroke count, and finally by radical. The BIG5 encoding was defined by the Institute for Information Industry of Taiwan in 1984.

Bopomofo: A phonetic system used for transcribing Chinese. Named for the first four letters of the traditional Chinese phonemic alphabet (bo, po, mo, and fo).

Chinese BIG5 order: Ideographs are ordered according to the code point values of the Taiwanese BIG5 industrial standard.

Chinese radical stroke order: Ideographs are ordered according to radical stroke count.

Chinese Unicode order: Deprecated. Identical to the default sort information used for English.

Georgian modern order: An order for the Georgian language that places archaic characters that are no longer used at the end of the alphabet.

Georgian traditional order: An order for the Georgian language that intersperses archaic characters that are no longer used among the rest of the alphabet in their traditional places.

German phone book order: An order that equates Ä, Ö, and Ü with AE, OE, and UE, respectively (commonly used in German phone books).

Hungarian default order: The typical expected alphabetical order for the Hungarian language.

Hungarian technical order: A sort order that places capital letters before lowercase ones, unlike most sorts, which sort lowercase first.

Japanese radical/stroke sort order: Ideographs are ordered by their radical and stroke components, much like an ideographic dictionary might do.

Japanese Unicode order: Deprecated. Identical to the default sort information used for English, except that the backslash (\) is equal to the currency symbol, 0x00A5, the yen sign.

Japanese XJIS order: Ideographs are ordered according to the code point values of the [JIS X 208] and [JIS X 212] government standards.

Korean KSC order: Ideographs are ordered according to the Korean Hangul pronunciation, as specified in the Korean [KSC 6501] government standard.

Korean Unicode order: Deprecated. Identical to the default sort information used for English, except that the backslash (\) is equal to the currency symbol, 0x20A9, the won sign.

neutral locale: A locale describing a language without any region-specific information.

PRC Chinese phonetic order: Ideographs are ordered according to their A to Z pronunciation order.

PRC Chinese stroke count order: Ideographs are ordered according to their stroke count.

specific locale: A locale describing a language that has a qualifying regional variant. For example, variants for English can be en-US or en-GB.

Traditional Chinese Bopomofo order: Ideographs are ordered by their most common Mandarin pronunciation, using the Chinese Bopomofo order of the pronunciations.

MAY, SHOULD, MUST, SHOULD NOT, MUST NOT: These terms (in all caps) are used as described in [RFC2119]. All statements of optional behavior use either MAY, SHOULD, or SHOULD NOT.

 
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