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Converting Earlier Versions to Version 6.3

The Bing Maps AJAX Control 6.3 has gone through significant changes with each release. The current version offers more functionality than any previous release of the map control. This article covers some of the changes required to migrate from versions 2, 3, 4, and 5 of the map control to version 6.3 of the map control.

Creating a Reference to the Map Control

Each release of the Bing Maps AJAX Control 6.3 requires a slightly different <script> tag src attribute. Listing 1 through Listing 5 shows the src attributes for versions 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.3 respectively.

http://dev.virtualearth.net/standard/v2/MapControl.js

Listing 1. The version 2 reference

http://dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/v3/mapcontrol.js

Listing 2. The version 3 reference

http://dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/v4/mapcontrol.js

Listing 3. The version 4 reference

http://dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=5

Listing 4. The version 5 reference

http://dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=6.3

Listing 5. The version 6.3 reference

Therefore, the version 6.3 map control <script> tag must appear as shown in Listing 6.

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=6.3"></script>

Listing 6. The full version 6.3 <script> tag

Cc161073.note(en-us,MSDN.10).gifNote:
The 6.3 version URL domain is different because this version of the map control uses the Microsoft Content Delivery Network (CDN) to give end users better performance. See the Bing Map Control Performance topic in the Bing Maps AJAX Control SDK for more information.

Basic Map Access

Version 2 of the map control uses a completely different mechanism to display a map than the newer versions of Bing Maps. Version 2 uses the Msn.VE.MapControl method to create a map. All newer versions of Bing Maps use a VEMap object. The sample code in Listing 7 displays a basic Bing Maps map using version 2.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<html>
   <head>
      <title>VE2 Sample</title>
      <link href="http://dev.virtualearth.net/standard/v2/MapControl.css" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" />

      <script type="text/javascript" src="http://dev.virtualearth.net/standard/v2/MapControl.js"></script>
   </head>
   <script type="text/javascript">
      var map = null;

      function MyOnLoad()
      {
         var params = new Object();
         params.latitude = 51.64;
         params.longitude = -0.18;
         params.zoomlevel = 9;
         params.mapstyle = 'r';
         params.showScaleBar = true;
         params.showDashboard = true;
         params.dashboardSize = "small";
         params.dashboardX = 3;
         params.dashboardY = 3;

         map = new Msn.VE.MapControl(document.getElementById("map"), params);    
         map.Init();
      }
   </script>
   <body onLoad="MyOnLoad();">
      <div id="map" style="width:600px;height:400px"></div>
   </body>
</html>

Listing 7. Code for creating a basic version 2 map

This produces a map similar to Figure 1.

Cc161073.d3c6aa90-c8bb-4961-ba4b-3f2ed5964320(en-us,MSDN.10).png

Figure 1. A basic version 2 map

Since version 3, the VEMap object provides methods for creating, loading and setting the map. With the exception of the map control URL, the code in Listing 8 generates a basic map similar to the code in Listing 7 in versions 3, 4, 5, and 6.3.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
   <head>
      <title>VE6.3 Sample</title>
      <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=6.3"></script>

      <script type="text/javascript">
         
         function OnPageLoad()
         {
            map = new VEMap('myMap');
            // SetDashboardSize must be called before calling LoadMap
            map.SetDashboardSize(VEDashboardSize.Small);
            map.LoadMap(new VELatLong(51.64, -0.18), 9, VEMapStyle.Road);
            map.ShowDashboard();
         }
      </script>
   </head>
   <body onload="OnPageLoad();">
      <div id='myMap' style="position:relative; width:600px; height:400px;"></div>
   </body>
</html>

Listing 8. Code for creating a basic version 6.3 map

This produces a map similar to Figure 2.

Cc161073.1e2aeb80-9819-4e2f-b188-c831bcf4d467(en-us,MSDN.10).png

Figure 2. A basic version 6.3 map

Note how the navigation bar has changed significantly from version 2 to version 6.3.

Latitude and Longitude

Version 2 of Bing Maps uses MSN.VE.LatLong objects to define latitude and longitude coordinates. All newer versions of Bing Maps use a VELatLong object to define latitude and longitude coordinate. Listing 9 shows how a latitude and longitude coordinate is defined in version 2.

var latlong = new Msn.VE.LatLong(47,-112);

Listing 9. Creating a latitude/longitude coordinate in version 2

Listing 10 shows how a latitude and longitude coordinate is defined in version 6.3.

var latlong = new VELatLong(47,-112);

Listing 10. Creating a latitude/longitude coordinate in version 6.3

Pushpins, Polylines, Polygons and Shapes

Version 5 release of the map control merged the VEPushpin, VEPolyline, and VEPolygon objects into the VEShape class. Version 2 had only pushpins.

Versions 2 thru 4 use the code shown in Listing 11 to add a pushpin to a map.

var pin = new VEPushpin(id, latlong, icon_url, title, details, iconStyle, titleStyle, detailsStyle);
map.AddPushpin(pin);

Listing 11. Adding a pushpin in versions 2, 3, and 4

Version 6.3 uses the code shown in Listing 12 to add a pushpin to a map.

var pin = new VEShape(VEShapeType.Pushpin, latlong);
pin.SetCustomIcon(icon_url);
pin.SetTitle(title);
pin.SetDescription(details);
map.AddShape(pin);

Listing 12. Adding a pushpin in version 6.3

Versions 3 and 4 use the code in Listing 13 and Listing 14 to add a polyline and polygon, respectively, to a map

var polyline = new VEPolyline(id, locations, color, width);
map.AddPolyline(polyline);

Listing 13. Adding a polyline to a map in versions 3 and 4

var polygon  = new VEPolygon(id, locations, fillColor, outlineColor, outlineWidth);
map.AddPolygon(polygon);

Listing 14. Adding a polygon to a map in versions 3 and 4

Versions 5 and 6.3 use the code in Listing 15 and Listing 16 to add a polyline and polygon, respectively, to a map

// locations is an array of VELatLong objects
var polyline = new VEShape(VEShapeType.Polyline, locations);
polyline.SetLineColor(color);
polyline.SetLineWidth(width);
map.AddShape(polyline);

Listing 15. Adding a polyline to a map in versions 5 and 6.3

// locations is an array of VELatLong objects
var polygon  = new VEShape(VEShapeType.Polygon, locations);
polygon.SetFillColor(fillColor);
polygon.SetLineColor(outlineColor);
polygon.SetLineWidth(outlineWidth);
map.AddShape(polygon);

Listing 16. Adding a polygon to a map in versions 5 and 6.3

Searching for Locations

The ability to search for locations is essential in all versions of Bing Maps. In version 2 this was accomplished using the Bing Maps Search Manager. This required accessing content outside of main Web page’s domain. Listing 17 shows a search in version 2.

function DoFind()
{
  var where = document.getElementById("WhereText").value;
  VE_SearchManager._ResetPaging();
  VE_SearchManager._CancelAllRequests();
  VE_SearchManager.searchPage="http://local.live.com/search.aspx";
  VE_SearchManager._DoSearch(where, where);
}

Listing 17. Searching for locations in version 2

This search functionality is no longer supported, as the local.live.com URL no longer supports query strings. Versions 3 and 4 use the Find, FindNearby, and FindLocation functions, as shown in Listing 18, Listing 19, and Listing 20, respectively.

map.Find(what,where, index, callback);

Listing 18. The Find function in versions 3 and 4

map.FindNearby(what, callback);

Listing 19. The FindNearby function in versions 3 and 4

map.FindLocation(where, callback);

Listing 20. The FindLocation function in versions 3 and 4

Version 5 combined these methods into the Find method. This method has many more options than its predecessors. The code in Listing 21, Listing 22, and Listing 23 are are equivalent to the Find, FindNearby, and FindLocation functions shown in Listing 18, Listing 19, and Listing 20, respectively.

map.Find(what, where, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, callback);

Listing 21. The Find function in versions 5 and 6.3

map.Find(what, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, callback);

Listing 22. The Find (nearby) function in versions 5 and 6.3

map.Find(null, where, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, callback);

Listing 23. The Find (location) function in versions 5 and 6.3

The other parameters in the Find method allow for extensive control over how the search is performed. You can, for example control whether pushpins are automatically created, or whether the map control displays a disambiguation dialog box if more than one result is returned.

Events

Version 5 renamed some of the map events that are used in versions 2, 3 and 4. In addition there are several new events available. Table 1 lists the changes.

Version 2, 3, and 4 Event Version 5 and 6.3 Event

onendcontinuouspan

onendpan

onstartcontinuouspan

onstartpan

oncontextmenu

onclick

VEPushpin.ShowDetailOnMouseover

onmouseover

Table 1. Event name changes from version 4 to version 5

In versions 2, 3, and 4 a common method for attaching events was to attach them to pushpins. In version 6.3 events are attached to the map. The code in Listing 24 is an example of how events are handled in versions 2, 3 and 4.

VEPushpin.OnMouseOverCallback = function(x,y) { // do something }

Listing 24. Handling the onmouseover event in versions 2, 3, and 4

The code in Listing 25 is an example of how events are handled in versions 5 and 6.3.

map.AttachEvent("onmouseover", onMouseOverCallback);
…
function onMouseOverCallback(e)
{
   // check to see if we have hovered over a pushpin
   if(e.elementID != null)
   {
    // do something
   }
}

Listing 25. Handling the onmouseover event in versions 5 and 6.3

Not only do versions 5 and 6.3 offer more events than previous versions, but you also have greater control over events.

Routes

Versions 3, 4, and 5 used the VEMap.GetRoute method to get a route. In version 6.3 this method is deprecated and a new VEMap.GetDirections method is used to display multi-point routes. The code in Listing 26 shows how the GetRoute method is used in versions 3, 4, and 5 to get a route from Seattle to Microsoft.

map.GetRoute("Seattle", "Microsoft");

Listing 26. Getting a route using GetRoute in versions 3, 4, and 5

The code in Listing 27 shows how the GetDirections method as used in version 6.3 to get a route from Seattle to Microsoft, through Bellevue.

map.GetDirections(["Seattle", "Bellevue WA", "Microsoft"]);

Listing 27. Getting a multi-point route using GetDirections in version 6.3

Conclusion

Although continuing to work with versions 2, 3 and 4 may appear easier than migrating to the newest version of Bing Maps, migrating will give you a lot more functionality. More information on the new features in version 6.3 can be found online at http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb412561.aspx.

About the Author

Richard Brundritt is a software developer at Infusion Development.

See Also

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