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Predicate<T> Delegate

Represents the method that defines a set of criteria and determines whether the specified object meets those criteria.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public delegate bool Predicate<in T>(
	T obj
)

Type Parameters

in T

The type of the object to compare.

This type parameter is contravariant. That is, you can use either the type you specified or any type that is less derived. For more information about covariance and contravariance, see Covariance and Contravariance in Generics.

Parameters

obj
Type: T

The object to compare against the criteria defined within the method represented by this delegate.

Return Value

Type: System.Boolean
true if obj meets the criteria defined within the method represented by this delegate; otherwise, false.

This delegate is used by several methods of the Array and List<T> classes to search for elements in the collection.

Typically, the Predicate<T> delegate is represented by a lambda expression. Because locally scoped variables are available to the lambda expression, it is easy to test for a condition that is not precisely known at compile time. This is simulated in the following example, which defines a HockeyTeam class that contains information about a National Hockey League team and the year in which it was founded. The example defines an array of integer values that represent years, and randomly assigns one element of the array to foundedBeforeYear, which is a variable that is locally scoped to the example's Main method. Because locally scoped variables are available to a lambda expression, the lambda expression passed to the List<T>.FindAll method is able to return a HockeyTeam object for each team founded on or before that year.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class HockeyTeam
{
   private string _name;
   private int _founded;

   public HockeyTeam(string name, int year)
   {
      _name = name;
      _founded = year;
   }

   public string Name {
      get { return _name; }
   }

   public int Founded {
      get { return _founded; }
   }
}

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      Random rnd = new Random();
      List<HockeyTeam> teams = new List<HockeyTeam>();
      teams.AddRange( new HockeyTeam[] { new HockeyTeam("Detroit Red Wings", 1926), 
                                         new HockeyTeam("Chicago Blackhawks", 1926),
                                         new HockeyTeam("San Jose Sharks", 1991),
                                         new HockeyTeam("Montreal Canadiens", 1909),
                                         new HockeyTeam("St. Louis Blues", 1967) } );
      int[] years = { 1920, 1930, 1980, 2000 };
      int foundedBeforeYear = years[rnd.Next(0, years.Length)];
      Console.WriteLine("Teams founded before {0}:", foundedBeforeYear);
      foreach (var team in teams.FindAll( x => x.Founded <= foundedBeforeYear))
         Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", team.Name, team.Founded);
   }
}
// The example displays output similar to the following: 
//       Teams founded before 1930: 
//       Detroit Red Wings: 1926 
//       Chicago Blackhawks: 1926 
//       Montreal Canadiens: 1909

The following code example uses a Predicate<T> delegate with the Array.Find<T> method to search an array of Point structures. The example explicitly defines a Predicate<T> delegate named predicate and assigns it a method named FindPoints that returns true if the product of the Point.X and Point.Y fields is greater than 100,000. Note that it is customary to use a lambda expression rather than to explicitly define a delegate of type Predicate<T>, as the second example illustrates.

using System;
using System.Drawing;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      // Create an array of Point structures.
      Point[] points = { new Point(100, 200), 
                         new Point(150, 250), new Point(250, 375), 
                         new Point(275, 395), new Point(295, 450) };

      // Define the Predicate<T> delegate.
      Predicate<Point> predicate = FindPoints;

      // Find the first Point structure for which X times Y   
      // is greater than 100000. 
      Point first = Array.Find(points, predicate);

      // Display the first structure found.
      Console.WriteLine("Found: X = {0}, Y = {1}", first.X, first.Y);
   }

   private static bool FindPoints(Point obj)
   {
      return obj.X * obj.Y > 100000;
   }
}
// The example displays the following output: 
//        Found: X = 275, Y = 395

The following example is identical to the previous example, except that it uses a lambda expression to represent the Predicate<T> delegate. Each element of the points array is passed to the lambda expression until the expression finds an element that meets the search criteria. In this case, the lambda expression returns true if the product of the X and Y fields is greater than 100,000.

using System;
using System.Drawing;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      // Create an array of Point structures.
      Point[] points = { new Point(100, 200), 
                         new Point(150, 250), new Point(250, 375), 
                         new Point(275, 395), new Point(295, 450) };

      // Find the first Point structure for which X times Y   
      // is greater than 100000. 
      Point first = Array.Find(points, x => x.X * x.Y > 100000 );

      // Display the first structure found.
      Console.WriteLine("Found: X = {0}, Y = {1}", first.X, first.Y);
   }
}
// The example displays the following output: 
//        Found: X = 275, Y = 395

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.5, 4, 3.5, 3.0, 2.0

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

Portable Class Library

Supported in: Portable Class Library

.NET for Windows Store apps

Supported in: Windows 8

.NET for Windows Phone apps

Supported in: Windows Phone 8.1, Windows Phone Silverlight 8.1, Windows Phone Silverlight 8

Windows Phone 8.1, Windows Phone 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

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