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Mining Model Content for Time Series Models (Analysis Services - Data Mining)

All mining models use the same structure to store their content. This structure is defined according to the data mining content schema rowset. However, within that standard structure, the nodes that contain information are arranged in different ways to represent various kinds of trees. This topic describes how the nodes are organized, and what each node means, for mining models that are based on the Microsoft Time Series algorithm. 

For an explanation of general mining model content that applies to all model types, see Mining Model Content (Analysis Services - Data Mining).

When reviewing this topic, you might find it useful follow along by browsing the contents of a time series model. You can create a time series model by completing the Basic Data Mining tutorial. The model you create in the tutorial is a mixed model that trains data by using both the ARIMA and ARTxp algorithms. For more information, see Creating a Forecasting Structure and Model (Intermediate Data Mining Tutorial). For information about how to view the contents of a mining model, see Viewing a Data Mining Model.

A time series model has a single parent node that represents the model and its metadata. Underneath that parent node, there are one or two time series trees, depending on the algorithm that you used to create the model.

If you create a mixed model, two separate trees are added to the model, one for ARIMA and one for ARTxp. If you choose to use only the ARTxp algorithm or only the ARIMA algorithm, you will have a single tree that corresponds to that algorithm. You specify which algorithm to use by setting the FORECAST_METHOD parameter. For more information about whether to use ARTxp, ARIMA, or a mixed model, see Microsoft Time Series Algorithm.

Structure of model content for time series models

An example of a time series data mining model that was created with the default settings, to create a mixed model, is shown in the diagram. So that you can more easily compare the differences between the two models, here the ARTxp model is shown on the left side of the diagram and the ARIMA model is shown in the right side of the diagram. Whereas ARTxp is a tree-like structure that splits into smaller and smaller branches, the structure created by the ARIMA algorithm is more like a pyramid built upwards from smaller components.

If you view a mixed model by using the Microsoft Generic Model Content Tree Viewer, the nodes in the ARTxp and ARIMA models are all presented as child nodes of the parent time series model. In the generic view of a mixed model, the first set of nodes is labeled (All), and represent the results of analysis by the ARTxp algorithm. The second set of nodes is labeled ARIMA, and represent the results of analysis by the ARIMA algorithm.

The important point to remember is that information is arranged within the ARIMA and ARTxp trees in completely different ways, and you should consider the two trees as related only at the root node. Although the two representations are presented in one model for convenience, they should be treated as two independent models. ARTxp represents an actual tree structure, but ARIMA does not.

NoteNote

The name (All) on the ARTxp tree is retained for backward compatibility. Prior to SQL Server 2008, the Time Series algorithm used a single algorithm for analysis, the ARTxp algorithm.

Structure of ARTxp Model

The ARTxp algorithm creates a model similar to a decision trees model. It groups predictable attributes and splits them whenever significant differences are found. Therefore, each ARTXp model contains a separate branch for each predictable attribute. For example, the Basic Data Mining tutorial creates a model that predicts the amount of sales for several regions. In this case, [Amount] is the predictable attribute and a separate branch is created for each region. If you had two predictable attributes, [Amount] and [Quantity], a separate branch would be created for each combination of an attribute and a region.

The top node for the ARTxp branch contains the same information that is in a decision tree root node. This includes the number of children for that node (CHILDREN_CARDINALITY), the number of cases that meet the conditions of this node (NODE_SUPPORT), and a variety of descriptive statistics (NODE_DISTRIBUTION).

If the node does not have any children, this means that no significant conditions were found that would justify dividing the cases into further subgroups. The branch ends at this point and the node is termed a leaf node. The leaf node contains the attributes, coefficients, and values that are the building blocks of the ARTxp formula.

Some branches may have additional splits, similar to a decision trees model. For example, the branch of the tree that represents sales for the Europe region splits into two branches. A split occurs when a condition exists that causes a significant different between the two groups. The parent node tells you the name of the attribute that caused the split, such as [Amount], and how many cases there are in the parent node. The leaf nodes provide more detail: the value of the attribute, such as Sales >10,000 vs. Sales < 10,000), the number of cases that support each condition, and the ARTxp formula.

NoteNote

If you want to view the formulas, you can find the complete regression formula at the leaf node level, but not in an intermediate or root node.

Structure of ARIMA Model

For each combination of a data series (such as [Region]) and a predictable attribute (such as [Sales Amount]) there is a single piece of information—the equation that describes the change of the predictable attribute over time.

The basic equation for each series is derived from multiple components, one for each periodic structure that was found in the data. For example, if you have sales data that is collected on a monthly basis, the algorithm might detect monthly, quarterly, or yearly periodic structures.

The algorithm outputs a separate set of parent and child nodes for each periodicity it finds. The default periodicity is 1, for a single time slice, and is automatically added into all models. You can specify possible periodic structures by entering multiple values in the PERIODICITY_HINT parameter. However, if the algorithm does not detect a periodic structure, it will not output results for that hint.

Each periodic structure that is output in the model content contains the following component nodes: a node for the autoregressive order (AR), and a node for the moving average (MA). The difference order is represented in the equation. For information about the meaning of these terms, see Microsoft Time Series Algorithm.

This section provides detail and examples only for those columns in the mining model content that have particular relevance for time series models.

For information about general-purpose columns in the schema rowset, such as MODEL_CATALOG and MODEL_NAME, or for explanations of mining model terminology, see Mining Model Content (Analysis Services - Data Mining).

MODEL_CATALOG

Name of the database where the model is stored.

MODEL_NAME

Name of the model.

ATTRIBUTE_NAME

The predictable attribute for the data series represented in the node. (The same value as for MSOLAP_MODEL_COLUMN.)

NODE_NAME

The name of the node. Currently, this column contains the same value as NODE_UNIQUE_NAME, although this might change in future releases.

NODE_UNIQUE_NAME

The unique name of the node. The model parent node is always named TS.

ARTxp: Each node is represented by TS followed by a hexadecimal numeric value. For example, the ARTxp nodes directly under the TS tree might be numbered TS00000001-TS0000000b. The order of the nodes is unimportant.

ARIMA: Each node in an ARIMA tree is represented by TA followed by a hexadecimal numeric value. The child nodes contain the unique name of the parent node followed by another hexadecimal number indicating the sequence within the node.

All ARIMA trees are structured exactly the same. Each root contains the nodes and naming convention exemplified in the following table:

ARIMA Node ID and type

Example of node name

ARIMA Root (27)

TA0000000b

ARIMA Periodic Structure (28)

TA0000000b00000000

ARIMA Auto Regressive (29)

TA0000000b000000000

ARIMA Moving Average (30)

TA0000000b000000001

NODE_TYPE

A time series model outputs the following node types, depending on the algorithm.

ARTxp:

Node Type ID

Description

1 (Model)

Time series

3 (Interior)

Represents an interior branch within an ARTxp time series tree.

16 (Time series tree)

Root of ARTxp tree that corresponds to a predictable attribute and series.

15 (Time series)

Leaf node in ARTxp tree.

ARIMA:

Node Type ID

Description

27 (ARIMA Root)

The top node of an ARIMA tree.

28 (ARIMA Periodic Structure)

Component of an ARIMA tree that describes a single periodic structure.

29 (ARIMA Autoregressive)

Contains a coefficient for a single periodic structure.

30 (ARIMA Moving Average)

Contains a coefficient for a single periodic structure.

NODE_CAPTION

A label or caption that is associated with the node. This property is primarily for display purposes.

ARTxp: Contains the split condition for the node, displayed as a combination of attribute and value range.

ARIMA: Contains the short form of the ARIMA equation.

For information about the format of the ARIMA equation, see Mining Legend for ARIMA.

CHILDREN_CARDINALITY

The number of direct children that the node has.

PARENT_UNIQUE_NAME

The unique name of the node's parent. NULL is returned for any nodes at the root level.

NODE_DESCRIPTION

A description in text of the rules, splits, or formulas in the current node.

ARTxp: For more information, see Understanding the ARTxp Tree.

ARIMA: For more information, see Understanding the ARIMA Tree.

NODE_RULE

An XML description of the rules, splits, or formulas in the current node.

ARTxp: The NODE_RULE generally corresponds to the NODE_CAPTION.

ARIMA: For more information, see Understanding the ARIMA Tree.

MARGINAL_RULE

An XML description of the split or content that is specific to that node.

ARTxp: The MARGINAL_RULE generally corresponds to the NODE_DESCRIPTION.

ARIMA: Always blank; use NODE_RULE instead.

NODE_PROBABILITY

ARTxp: For tree nodes, always 1. For leaf nodes, the probability of reaching the node from the model root node.

ARIMA: Always 0.

MARGINAL_PROBABILITY

ARTxp: For tree nodes, always 1. For leaf nodes, the probability of reaching the node from the immediate parent node.

ARIMA: Always 0.

NODE_DISTRIBUTION

A table that contains the probability histogram of the node. In a time series model, this nested table contains all the components required to assemble the actual regression formula.

For more information about the node distribution table in an ARTxp tree, see Understanding the ARTxp Tree.

For more information about the node distribution table in an ARIMA tree, see Understanding the ARIMA Tree.

If you wish to see all the constants and other components composed into a readable format, use the Time Series Viewer, click the node, and open the Mining Legend.

NODE_SUPPORT

The number of cases that support this node.

ARTxp: For the (All) node, indicates the total number of time slices included in the branch. For terminal nodes, indicates the number of time slices that are included in the range that is described by NODE_CAPTION. The number of time slices in the terminal nodes always sums to the NODE_SUPPORT value of the branch (All) node.

ARIMA: A count of cases that support the current periodic structure. The value for support is repeated in all nodes of the current periodic structure.

MSOLAP_MODEL_COLUMN

The predictable attribute for the data series represented in the node. (The same value as for ATTRIBUTE_NAME.)

MSOLAP_NODE_SCORE

A numeric value that characterizes the information value of the tree or split.

ARTxp: Value is always 0.0 for nodes without a split. For nodes with a split, represents the interestingness score of the split.

For more information about scoring methods, see Feature Selection in Data Mining.

ARIMA: The Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) score of the ARIMA model. The same score is set on all the ARIMA nodes related to the equation.

MSOLAP_NODE_SHORT_CAPTION

ARTxp: Same information as the NODE_DESCRIPTION.

ARIMA: Same information as the NODE_CAPTION: that is, the short form of the ARIMA equation.

The ARTxp model clearly separates the areas of the data that are linear from the areas of the data that split on some other factor. Wherever the changes in the predictable attribute can be directly represented as a function of the independent variables, a regression formula is calculated to represent that relationship. For example, if there is a direct correlation between time and sales for most of the data series, each series would be contained within a time series tree (NODE_TYPE =16) that has no child nodes for each data series, only a regression equation. However, if the relationship is not linear, an ARTxp time series tree can split on conditions into child nodes, just like a decision tree model. By viewing the model content in the Microsoft Generic Content Tree Viewer you can see where the splits occur, and how it affects the trend line.

For example, review the time series model created in the Basic Data Mining Tutorial. This model, taken from Adventure Works, is not based on complex data. Therefore, there are not many splits in the ARTxp tree. However, even this relatively simple model illustrates three different kinds of splits:

  • The Amount trend line for the Pacific region splits on the time key. A split on the time key means that there is a change in the trend at a certain point in time. The trend line was linear only up to a certain point, and then the curve assumed a different shape. For example, one time series might continue until August 6, 2002, and another time series start after that date.

  • The Amount trend line for the North America region splits on another variable. In this case, the trend for North America splits based on the value for the same model in the Europe region. In other words, the algorithm detected that when the value for Europe changes, the value for North America A also changes.

  • The trend line for Europe region splits on itself.

What does each split mean? Interpreting the information conveyed by the model content is an art that requires a deep understanding of the data and its meaning in the business context.

The apparent link between the trends for the North America and Europe regions may signify only that the data series for Europe has more entropy, which causes the trend for the North America to appear weaker. Or, there might be no significant difference in the scoring for the two, and the correlation could be accidental, based simply on computing Europe before computing North America. However, you might want to review the data and make sure whether the correlation is false, or investigate to see if some other factor might involved.

The split on the time key means that there is a statistically significant change in the gradient of the line. This might have been caused by mathematical factors such as the support for each range, or the calculations of entropy required for the split. Thus, this split might not be interesting in terms of the model's meaning in the real world. However, when you review the time period indicated in the split, you might find interesting correlations that are not represented in the data, such a sales promotion or other event that began at that time and that may have affected the data.

If the data contained other attributes, you would very likely see more interesting examples of branching in the tree. For example, if you tracked weather information and used that as an attribute for analysis, you might see multiple splits in the tree that represent the complex interaction of sales and weather.

In short, data mining is useful for providing hints about where potentially interesting phenomena occur, but further investigation and the expertise of the business users is necessary to accurately interpret the worth of the information in context.

Elements of the ARTxp Time Series Formula

To view the complete formula for an ARTxp tree or branch, we recommend that you use the Mining Legend of the Microsoft Time Series Viewer, which presents all of the constants in a readable format.

This section presents a sample equation and explains the basic terms.

Mining Legend for ARTxp Formula

The following example shows the ARTxp formula for one part of the model, as displayed in the Mining Legend. To view this formula, open the Forecasting model that you created in the Basic Data Mining Tutorial in the Microsoft Time Series viewer, click the Model tab, and select the tree for the R250: Europe data series, and then click the node that represents the date series on or after 7/5/2003.

Example of tree node equation:

Quantity = 21.322

-0.293 * Quantity(R250 North America,-7) + 0.069 * Quantity(R250 Europe,-1) + 0.023 *

Quantity(R250 Europe,-3) -0.142 * Quantity(R750 Europe,-8)

In this case, the value 21.322 represents the value that is predicted for Quantity as a function of the elements of the equation. For example, one element is Quantity(R250 North America,-7). This notation means the quantity for the North America region at t-7, or seven time slices before the current time slice. The value for this data series is multiplied by the coefficient -0.293. The coefficient for each element is derived during the training process and is based on trends in the data.

There are multiple elements in this equation because the model has calculated that the quantity of the R250 model in the Europe region is dependent on the values of several other data series.

Model Content for ARTxp Formula

The following table shows the same information for the node, as displayed in the Microsoft Generic Content Tree Viewer (Data Mining Designer).

ATTRIBUTE_NAME

ATTRIBUTE_VALUE

SUPPORT

PROBABILITY

VARIANCE

VALUETYPE

Quantity(R250 Europe,y-intercept)

21.3223433563772

11

0

1.65508795539661

11 (Intercept)

Quantity(R250 Europe,-1)

0.0691694140876526

0

0

0

7 (Coefficient)

Quantity(R250 Europe,-1)

20.6363635858123

0

0

182.380682874818

9 (Statistics)

Quantity(R750 Europe,-8)

-0.1421203048299

0

0

0

7 (Coefficient)

Quantity(R750 Europe,-8)

22.5454545333019

0

0

104.362130048408

9 (Statistics)

Quantity(R250 Europe,-3)

0.0234095979448281

0

0

0

7 (Coefficient)

Quantity(R250 Europe,-3)

24.8181818883176

0

0

176.475304989169

9 (Statistics)

Quantity(R250 North America,-7)

-0.292914186039869

0

0

0

7 (Coefficient)

Quantity(R250 North America,-7)

10.36363640433

0

0

701.882534898676

9 (Statistics)

The mining model content contains the same information that is available in the Mining Legend, but with the additional columns for variance and support. The value for support indicates the count of cases that support the trend described by this equation.

Using the ARTxp Time Series Formula

For most business users, the value of the ARTxp model content is that it provides both a tree view and a linear representation of the data. If the changes in the predictable attribute can be represented as a function of the independent variables, the algorithm will automatically compute the regression equation and output that series in a separate node. However, if other factors prevent a linear correlation, the time series branches like a decision tree. By browsing the model content in the Microsoft Time Series Viewer you can see where the split occurs, and how it affects the trend line.

If a direct correlation exists between time and sales for any part of the data series, the easiest way to get the formula is to copy the formula from the Mining Legend, and then paste it into a document or presentation to help explain the model. Alternatively, you could extract the mean, coefficient, and other information from the NODE_DISTRIBUTION table for that tree and use it to compute extensions of the trend. If the entire series exhibits a consistent linear relationship, the equation is contained in the (All) node. If there is any branching in the tree, the equation is contained in the leaf node.

The following query returns all the ARTxp leaf nodes from a mining model, together with the nested table, NODE_DISTRIBUTION, which contains the equation.

SELECT MODEL_NAME, ATTRIBUTE_NAME, NODE_NAME,
NODE_CAPTION, 
(SELECT ATTRIBUTE_NAME, ATTRIBUTE_VALUE, [VARIANCE], VALUETYPE
FROM NODE_DISTRIBUTION) as t
FROM Forecasting.CONTENT
WHERE NODE_TYPE = 15

Each structure in an ARIMA model corresponds to a periodicity or periodic structure. A periodic structure is a pattern of data that repeats throughout the data series. Some minor variation in the pattern is allowed, within statistical limits. Periodicity is measured according to the default time units that were used in the training data. For example, if the training data provides sales data for each day, the default time unit is one day, and all periodic structures are defined as a specified number of days.

Each period that is detected by the algorithm gets its own structure node. For example, if you are analyzing daily sales data, the model might detect periodic structures that represent weeks. In this case, the algorithm will create two periodic structures in the finished model: one for the default daily period, denoted as {1}, and one for weeks, indicated by {7}.

For example, the following query returns all the ARIMA structures from a mining model.

SELECT MODEL_NAME, ATTRIBUTE_NAME, NODE_NAME, NODE_CAPTION
FROM Forecasting.CONTENT
WHERE NODE_TYPE = 27

Example results:

MODEL_NAME

ATTRIBUTE_NAME

NODE_NAME

NODE_TYPE

NODE_CAPTION

Forecasting

M200 Europe:Quantity

TA00000000

27

ARIMA (1,0,1)

Forecasting

M200 North America:Quantity

TA00000001

27

ARIMA (1,0,4) X (1,1,4)(6)

Forecasting

M200 Pacific:Quantity

TA00000002

27

ARIMA (2,0,8) X (1,0,0)(4)

Forecasting

M200 Pacific:Quantity

TA00000002

27

ARIMA (2,0,8) X (1,0,0)(4)

Forecasting

R250 Europe:Quantity

TA00000003

27

ARIMA (1,0,7)

Forecasting

R250 North America:Quantity

TA00000004

27

ARIMA (1,0,2)

Forecasting

R250 Pacific:Quantity

TA00000005

27

ARIMA (2,0,2) X (1,1,2)(12)

Forecasting

R750 Europe:Quantity

TA00000006

27

ARIMA (2,1,1) X (1,1,5)(6)

Forecasting

T1000 Europe:Quantity

TA00000009

27

ARIMA (1,0,1)

Forecasting

T1000 North America:Quantity

TA0000000a

27

ARIMA (1,1,1)

Forecasting

T1`000 Pacific:Quantity

TA0000000b

27

ARIMA (1,0,3)

From these results, which you can also browse by using the Microsoft Generic Content Tree Viewer (Data Mining Designer), you can tell at a glance which series are completely linear, which have multiple periodic structures, and what the discovered periodicities are.

For example, the short form of the ARIMA Equation for the M200 Europe series tells you that only the default, or daily, cycle was detected. The short form of the equation is provided in the NODE_CAPTION column.

However, for the M200 North America series, an additional periodic structure was found. The node TA00000001 has two child nodes, one with the equation, (1,0,4), and one with the equation, (1,1,4)(6). These equations are concatenated and presented in the parent node.

For each periodic structure, the model content also provides the order and the moving average as child nodes. For example, the following query retrieves the child nodes of one of the nodes listed in the previous example. Notice that the column, PARENT_UNIQUE_NAME, must be enclosed in brackets to distinguish it from the reserved keyword of the same name.

SELECT * 
FROM Forecasting.CONTENT
WHERE [PARENT_UNIQUE_NAME] = ' TA00000001'

Because this is an ARIMA tree, not an ARTxp tree, you cannot use the IsDescendant (DMX) function to return nodes that are a child node of this periodic structure. Instead, you can use the attribute and node types to filter the results and return the child nodes that provide more detail about how the equation was built, including the moving averages and difference order.

SELECT MODEL_NAME, ATTRIBUTE_NAME, NODE_UNIQUE_NAME,
NODE_TYPE,  NODE_CAPTION
FROM Forecasting.CONTENT
WHERE [MSOLAP_MODEL_COLUMN] ='M200 North America:Quantity'
AND (NODE_TYPE = 29 or NODE_TYPE = 30)

Example results:

MODEL_NAME

ATTRIBUTE_NAME

NODE_UNIQUE_NAME

NODE_TYPE

NODE_CAPTION

Forecasting

M200 North America:Quantity

TA00000001000000010

29

ARIMA {1,0.961832044807041}

Forecasting

M200 North America:Quantity

TA00000001000000011

30

ARIMA {1,-3.51073103693271E-02,2.15731642954099,-0.220314343327742,-1.33151478258758}

Forecasting

M200 North America:Quantity

TA00000001000000000

29

ARIMA {1,0.643565911081657}

Forecasting

M200 North America:Quantity

TA00000001000000001

30

ARIMA {1,1.45035399809581E-02,-4.40489283927752E-02,-0.19203901352577,0.242202497643993}

These examples illustrate that the further you drill down into the ARIMA tree, the more detail is revealed, but the important information is combined and presented in the parent node as well.

Time Series Formula for ARIMA

To view the complete formula for any ARIMA node, we recommend that you use the Mining Legend of the Microsoft Time Series Viewer, which presents the autoregressive order, moving averages, and other elements of the equation already composed in a consistent format.

This section presents a sample equation and explains the basic terms.

Mining Legend for ARIMA Formula

The following example shows the ARIMA formula for one part of the model, as displayed in the Mining Legend. To view this formula, open the Forecasting model by using the Microsoft Time Series viewer, click the Model tab, select the tree for the R250: Europe data series, and then click the node that represents the date series on or after 7/5/2003. The mining legend composes all of the constants in a readable format, shown in this example:

ARIMA equation:

ARIMA ({1,1},0,{1,1.49791920964142,1.10640053499397,0.888873034670339,-5.05429403071953E-02,-0.905265316720334,-0.961908900643379,-0.649991020901922}) Intercept:56.8888888888889

This equation is the long ARIMA format, which includes the values of the coefficients and the intercept. The short format for this equation would be {1,0,7}, where 1 indicates the period as a count of time slices, 0 indicates the term difference order, and 7 indicates the number of coefficients.

NoteNote

A constant is calculated by Analysis Services for computing variance, but the constant itself is not displayed anywhere in the user interface. However, you can view the variance for any point in the series as a function of this constant if you select Show Deviations, in Chart view. The Tooltip for each data series shows the variance for a specific predicted point.

Model Content for ARIMA Formula

An ARIMA model follows a standard structure, with different information contained in nodes of different types. To view the model content for the ARIMA model, change the viewer to the Microsoft Generic Content Tree Viewer, and then expand the node that has the attribute name, R250 Europe: Quantity.

An ARIMA model for a data series contains the basic periodic equation in four different formats, which you can choose from depending on the application.

NODE_CAPTION: Displays the short format of the equation. The short format tells you how many periodic structures are represented, and how many coefficients they have. For example, if the short format of the equation is {4,0,6}, the node represents one periodic structure with 6 coefficients. If the short format is something like {2,0,8} x {1,0,0}(4), the node contains two periodic structures.

NODE DESCRIPTION: Displays the long format of the equation, which is also the form of the equation that appears in the Mining Legend. The long form of the equation is similar to the short form, except that the actual values of the coefficients are displayed instead of being counted.

NODE_RULE: Displays an XML representation of the equation. Depending on the node type, the XML representation can include single or multiple periodic structures. The following table illustrates how XML nodes are rolled up to higher levels of the ARIMA model.

Node Type

XML content

27 (ARIMA Root)

Includes all periodic structures for the data series, and the content of all child nodes for each periodic structure.

28 (ARIMA Periodic Structure)

Defines a single periodic structure, including its autoregressive term node and its moving average coefficients.

29 (ARIMA Autoregressive)

Lists the terms for a single periodic structure.

30 (ARIMA Moving Average)

Lists the coefficients for a single periodic structure.

NODE_DISTRIBUTION: Displays terms of the equation in a nested table, which you can query to obtain specific terms. The node distribution table follows the same hierarchical structure as the XML rules. That is, the root node of the ARIMA series (NODE_TYPE = 27) contains the intercept value and the periodicities for the complete equation, which can include multiple periodicities, whereas the child nodes contain only information specific to a certain periodic structure or to the child nodes of that periodic structure.

Node Type

Attribute

Value type

27 (ARIMA Root)

Intercept

Periodicity

11

28 (ARIMA Periodic Structure)

Periodicity

Auto Regressive order

Difference order

Moving average order

12

13

15

14

29 (ARIMA Autoregressive)

Coefficient

(complement of coefficient)

7

30 (ARIMA Moving Average)

Value at t

Value at t-1

Value at t-n

7

The value for the moving average order indicates the number of moving averages in a series. Generally the moving average is calculated n-1 times if there are n terms in a series, but the number can be reduced for easier computation.

The value for autoregressive order indicates the number of autoregressive series.

The value for difference order indicates how many times the series are compared, or differenced.

For an enumeration of the possible value types, see MiningValueType.

Using the ARIMA Tree Information

If you use predictions that are based on the ARIMA algorithm in a business solution, you might want to paste the equation into a report to demonstrate the method that was used to create the prediction. You can use either the caption or the description, to present the formulas in short or long format, respectively.

If you are developing an application that uses time series predictions, you might find it useful to obtain the ARIMA equation from the model content and then make your own predictions. To obtain the ARIMA equation for any particular output, you can query the ARIMA root for that particular attribute directly, as shown in the previous examples.

If you know the ID of the node that contains the series you want, you have two options to retrieve the components of the equation:

  • Nested table format: Use a DMX query or query via OLEDB client.

  • XML representation: Use an XML query.

It can be difficult to retrieve information from an ARTxp tree, because information for each split is in a different place within the tree. Therefore, with an ARTxp model, you must get all the pieces and then do some processing to reconstitute the complete formula. Retrieving an equation from an ARIMA model is easier because the formula has been made available throughout the tree. For information about how to create a query to retrieve this information, see Querying a Time Series Model (Analysis Services - Data Mining).

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