Export (0) Print
Expand All

Tutorial 1: Creating a Device

The CreateDevice tutorial project initializes Microsoft Direct3D, renders a simple blue screen, and eventually shuts down.

Path

Source location: (SDK root)\Samples\Managed\Direct3D\Tutorials\Tutorial1

Procedure

Creating an Application Window

The first thing any Microsoft Windows application must do when run is to create an application window. To do this, the first call in the Main() function of the following sample code is to the constructor of an application-defined CreateDevice class that sets the size of the display window, the caption of the window, and the window icon. CreateDevice is created from the System.Windows.Forms.FormLeave Site class used in the Microsoft .NET Framework to represent a window in an application.


          [C#]
          using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Microsoft.DirectX;
using Microsoft.DirectX.Direct3D;

namespace DeviceTutorial
{
    public class CreateDevice : Form
    {
        // Our global variables for this project
        Device device = null; // Our rendering device

        public CreateDevice()
        {
            // Set the initial size of our form
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(400,300);
            // And its caption
            this.Text = "D3D Tutorial 01: CreateDevice";
        }
        .
        .
        .
    }
    .
    .
    .
}

Initializing the Direct3D Object

After you create the application window, you are ready to initialize the Direct3D object that you will use to render the scene. This process includes creating the object, setting the presentation parameters, and finally creating the Direct3D device.


          [C#]
          public bool InitializeGraphics()
{
    try
    {
        // Now  setup our D3D stuff
        PresentParameters presentParams = new PresentParameters();
        presentParams.Windowed=true;
        presentParams.SwapEffect = SwapEffect.Discard;
        device = new Device(0, DeviceType.Hardware, this, 
        		CreateFlags.SoftwareVertexProcessing, presentParams);
        		return true;
    }
    catch (DirectXException)
    { 
         return false; 
    }
}

The preceding code sample relies upon a PresentParameters object that is used to set the windows display characteristics. For example, by setting the Windowed property to true, the size of the window displayed is less than full screen. This default small-window format has no menu or child windows, but it includes Minimize, Maximize, and Close buttons common to windowed applications. In this case, the ability to quickly swap back buffer memory into system memory is disabled with the SwapEffect.Discard flag. If the Windowed property is instead false, then the created window is placed above all non-topmost windows and should stay above them, even when the window is deactivated.

The final step in the initialization procedure is to create the Direct3D device. In this example the flags input to the Device(Int32,DeviceType,Control,CreateFlags,PresentParameters[]) specify that a hardware device is preferred, and that vertex processing is to be done in software. Note that if you tell the system to use hardware vertex processing by specifying CreateFlags.HardwareVertexProcessing, you will see a significant performance gain on video cards that support hardware vertex processing.

Rendering the Direct3D Object

The application is kept running in a loop using the ApplicationLeave Site.DoEventsLeave Site method, which here takes as its argument a CreateDevice object called frm. DoEventsLeave Site runs a standard Windows application message loop on the current thread.


          [C#]
          static void Main() 
{

    using (CreateDevice frm = new CreateDevice())
    {
        if (!frm.InitializeGraphics()) // Initialize Direct3D
        {
            MessageBox.Show(
            	"Could not initialize Direct3D.  This tutorial will exit.");
            return;
        }
        frm.Show();

        // While the form is still valid, render and process messages
        while(frm.Created)
        {
            frm.Render();
            Application.DoEvents();
        }
    }
}

While the created CreateDevice FormLeave Site object is valid, an application-defined Render method is called to render the Direct3D object. First the viewport (the open window) is set to be a uniform blue color with the Device.Clear method. Scene rendering is begun using the Device.BeginScene method. Rendering is completed and the scene is ended with successive calls to the EndScene and Present methods.


          [C#]
          private void Render()
{
    if (device == null) 
        return;

    //Clear the backbuffer to a blue color 
    device.Clear(ClearFlags.Target, System.Drawing.Color.Blue, 1.0f, 0);
    //Begin the scene
    device.BeginScene();
    
    // Rendering of scene objects can happen here

    //End the scene
    device.EndScene();
    device.Present();
}
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft