Export (0) Print
Expand All

Using Visual Basic for Applications in Outlook

Office 2003

Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) in Microsoft Outlook makes it easy to control Outlook within Outlook itself. Using Visual Basic for Applications in Outlook, you can create macros that perform complex or repetitive tasks automatically. You can also develop program code that responds to Outlook events, allowing you to automate common tasks (such as arranging windows when Outlook starts).

Visual Basic for Applications in Outlook allows you to take full advantage of the Outlook object model, including the wide range of application-level events, without requiring you to run an external application (such as another Microsoft Office application or an application developed using Microsoft Visual Basic). And unlike form scripts developed using Microsoft Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript), Outlook Visual Basic for Applications code is always available in the application; an item does not have to be open to run the code.

All Outlook Visual Basic for Applications code is contained in a project. The project is associated with a particular user, so all users who run Outlook on a computer can customize Outlook to meet their own needs. A project can contain code modules and User Form modules (note that User Form modules are not the same as Outlook forms ).

You use the Visual Basic Editor to create and remove modules, to design User Form modules, and to edit code in modules. This editor provides a powerful set of tools, including a built-in Object Browser and debugger to make developing and troubleshooting code easy. You can even use the Visual Basic Editor in Outlook to develop and test code that you can then copy to a standalone Visual Basic application or a Visual Basic for Applications application in another Microsoft Office application.

You can export a module to a file; this makes it easy to share your programs with other users, who can use the Visual Basic Editor to import the module into their own Outlook Visual Basic for Applications projects.

Learn about writing an Outlook macro , responding to Outlook events , and designing Visual Basic for Applications forms .





Show:
© 2014 Microsoft