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Shrinking the Transaction Log

SQL Server 2000

Shrinking the Transaction Log

The size of the log files are physically reduced when:

  • A DBCC SHRINKDATABASE statement is executed.

  • A DBCC SHRINKFILE statement referencing a log file is executed.

  • An autoshrink operation occurs.

Shrinking a log is dependent on first truncating the log. Log truncation does not reduce the size of a physical log file, it reduces the size of the logical log and marks as inactive the virtual logs that do not hold any part of the logical log. A log shrink operation removes enough inactive virtual logs to reduce the log file to the requested size.

The unit of size reduction is a virtual log. For example, if you have a 600 MB log file that has been divided into six 100 MB virtual logs, the size of the log file can only be reduced in 100 MB increments. The file size can be reduced to sizes such as 500 MB or 400 MB, but it cannot be reduced to sizes such as 433 MB or 525 MB.

Virtual logs that hold part of the logical log cannot be freed. If all the virtual logs in a log file hold parts of the logical log, the file cannot be shrink until a truncation marks one or more of the virtual logs at the end of the physical log as inactive.

When any file is shrunk, the space freed must come from the end of the file. When a transaction log file is shrunk, enough virtual logs from the end of the file are freed to reduce the log to the size requested by the user. The target_size specified by the user is rounded to the next highest virtual log boundary. For example, if a user specifies a target_size of 325 MB for our sample 600 MB file with 100 MB virtual log files, the last two virtual log files are removed and the new file size is 400 MB.

In SQL Server 2000, a DBCC SHRINKDATABASE or DBCC SHRINKFILE operation attempts to shrink the physical log file to the requested size (subject to rounding) immediately:

  • If no part of the logical log is in the virtual logs beyond the target_size mark, the virtual logs after the target_size mark are freed and the successful DBCC statement completes with no messages.

  • If part of the logical log is in the virtual logs beyond the target_size mark, SQL Server 2000 frees as much space as possible and issues an informational message. The message tells you what actions you need to perform to get the logical log out of the virtual logs at the end of the file. After you perform this action, you can then reissue the DBCC statement to free the remaining space.

For example, assume that a 600 MB log file with six virtual logs has a logical log starting in virtual log 3 and ending in virtual log 4, when you execute a DBCC SHRINKFILE statement with a target_size of 275 MB:

Virtual logs 5 and 6 are freed immediately because they hold no portion of the logical log. To meet the specified target_size, however, virtual log 4 should also be freed, but cannot because it holds the end portion of the logical log. After freeing virtual logs 5 and 6, SQL Server 2000 fills the remaining part of virtual log 4 with dummy records. This forces the end of the log file to virtual log 1. In most systems, all transactions starting in virtual log 4 will be committed within seconds, meaning that all of the active portion of the log moves to virtual log 1, and the log file now looks like this:

The DBCC SHRINKFILE statement also issues an informational message that it could not free all the space requested, and indicate that you can execute a BACKUP LOG statement to make it possible to free the remaining space. Once the active portion of the log moves to virtual log 1, a BACKUP LOG statement will truncate the entire logical log that is in virtual log 4:

Because virtual log 4 no longer holds any portion of the logical log, if you now execute the same DBCC SHRINKFILE statement with a target_size of 275 MB, virtual log 4 will be freed and the size of the physical log file reduced to the size requested.

See Also

BACKUP

Setting Database Options

Space Allocation and Reuse

Transaction Log Backups

Truncating the Transaction Log

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