Build Awesome Apps with CSS3 Animations

By David Rousset

Today’s HTML5 applications can provide awesome experiences thanks to the new CSS3 specifications. One of them is CSS3 Animations. It can help you building rich animations on HTML elements. This can provide interesting feedbacks to the users and enables fast & fluid UIs. As those new animations are most of time hardware accelerated by the GPU, they definitely raise up the quality bar of the new generation of HTML5 applications.

Today’s HTML5 applications can provide awesome experiences thanks to the new CSS3 specifications. One of them is CSS3 Animations. It can help you building rich animations on HTML elements. This can provide interesting feedbacks to the users and enables fast & fluid UIs. As those new animations are most of time hardware accelerated by the GPU, they definitely raise up the quality bar of the new generation of HTML5 applications.

According to the “CSS Animation Module Level 3” specification on the W3C site, CSS3 Animations introduces defined animations, which specify the values that CSS properties will take over a given time interval. This specification is an extension to CSS Transitions.

As CSS3 Animation is an extension to CSS3 Transitions, you should first read the article of my colleague David Catuhe on Transitions here: Introduction to CSS3 Transitions.

We’ll see in this article an interesting demo highlighting the potential of CSS3 animations, how to build simple animations & how to handle fallback in JavaScript:

  1. CSS3 Animations
  2. Browsers Support
  3. CSS3 Animations JavaScript fallback library
  4. Conclusion

Let’s first start by quickly demonstrating what CSS3 Animations are. Here is a sample animation of a StarWars AT-AT which uses CSS3 Animations to animate parts of the transport (and which will fall back to JavaScript if your browser doesn’t support CSS3 Animations):

You can test this sample also in a separate window here: http://david.blob.core.windows.net/html5/css3atat/index.htm