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February2004 February 2004
Yukon Basics: XML, T-SQL, and the CLR Create a New World of Database Programming
The next version of SQL Server, code-named "Yukon," includes quite a few enhancements and expanded language support. For example, Transact-SQL now conforms more closely to the ANSI-99 SQL specification and makes querying more flexible and expressive. Yukon can execute user-defined functions, stored procedures, and triggers written in CLR-targeted languages, including Visual Basic .NET and C#. It supports a subset of the W3C standard XQuery language, and has native XML support.In this article, the author outlines the most significant language features and builds an order-entry sample app. Eric Brown
XML in Yukon: New Version Showcases Native XML Type and Advanced Data Handling
The next version of Microsoft SQL Server, code-named "Yukon," represents quite a few steps forward in the evolution of XML integration. Yukon supports native storage of XML data using the XML data type, which makes it possible to run native queries on XML data using the emerging industry standard XQuery language. Data integrity of the XML data type can be enforced through schema validation and XML-based check constraints, and special indexes can be defined that help speed up queries. In addition, Yukon has the built-in ability to expose its data through Web services. This article discusses these and other XML features of Yukon. Bob Beauchemin
T-SQL in Yukon: Powerful New T-SQL Syntax Gives SQL Server a Programmability Boost
The T-SQL language in the upcoming version of SQL Server will provide more power and flexibility than previous versions. Additions and enhancements include error handling with the TRY/CATCH construct, SNAPSHOT isolation, and WAITFOR enhancements. Also important are the BULK rowset provider, common table expressions, recursive queries, PIVOT and UNPIVOT operators, and much more. This article introduces these features so readers will be ready for the next version of SQL Server. Itzik Ben-Gan
Types in Yukon: Managed UDTs Let You Extend the SQL Server Type System
The next version of SQL Server, code-named "Yukon," will offer enhanced support for user-defined types (UDTs). Because UDTs can be managed by the CLR, you can represent a wide variety of data structures to create types not possible with previous versions of SQL Server. With UDTs you can more precisely control the kind of data your type accepts, resulting in better data management. This article explores UDTs in "Yukon" and covers their design and implementation. Peter W. DeBetta
Standard I/O: Console Appplications in .NET, or Teaching a New Dog Old Tricks
The Microsoft .NET Framework is not just about Windows Forms and Web services. This article discusses the simplest kind of Framework-based application—the console app—along with the frequently overlooked constructs of standard input/output and the pipe. When designed carefully, console applications offer a surprisingly powerful way of solving complex programming problems. One of the more exciting aspects of this approach is that while each application in the pipe is fairly simple, the result of their interaction can be a relatively complex task. Here the author explores the ins and outs of writing these console apps. Michael Brook
Timers: Comparing the Timer Classes in the .NET Framework Class Library
Timers often play an important role in both client applications and server-based components (including Windows services). Writing effective timer-driven managed code requires a clear understanding of program flow and the subtleties of the .NET threading model. The .NET Framework Class Library provides three different timer classes: System.Windows.Forms.Timer, System.Timers.Timer, and System.Threading.Timer. Each of these classes has been designed and optimized for use in different situations. This article examines the three timer classes and helps you gain an understanding of how and when each class should be used. Alex Calvo
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Columns
Editor's Note: Yukon Bonanza
New Stuff: Resources for Your Developer Toolbox
Theresa W. Carey
Web Q&A: ANSI Chars in XML, E-commerce Architecture, and More
Edited by Nancy Michell
Cutting Edge: Owner-Drawing in .NET
Dino Esposito
The XML Files: XML Report from the Microsoft PDC 2003
Aaron Skonnard
The ASP Column: Web Services: ATL Server Versus ASP.NET
George Shepherd
Wicked Code: Client-side Paging for DataGrids
Jeff Prosise
C++ Q&A: Color Support, Console Apps, and Saving User Settings
Paul DiLascia
Resource File: Mobile and Embedded Application Development
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