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Creating ASP.NET Web Applications

ASP.NET provides a unified Web development model that includes the services necessary for you to build enterprise-class Web applications. While ASP.NET is largely syntax compatible with Active Server Pages (ASP), it provides a new programming model and infrastructure that allow you to create a powerful new class of applications. ASP.NET is part of the .NET Framework and allows you to take full advantage of the features of the common language runtime, such as type safety, inheritance, language interoperability, and versioning.

This section provides you with conceptual information about how ASP.NET works and procedural topics that show you how to write code that takes full advantage of the power of this new technology.

In This Section

ASP.NET Platform Requirements
Details the hardware and software needed to work with ASP.NET.
Introduction to ASP.NET
Provides a brief overview of all the ASP.NET technologies.
ASP.NET Application Walkthrough
Provides a sample deployment of an ASP.NET application. The application demonstrates a directory structure, including virtual roots and the bin directory, where to store assemblies, and where the application configuration file resides.
Security Considerations for ASP.NET Web Applications
Provides an introduction to security in Web applications and explains basic strategies for protecting the application and your system.
Securing ASP.NET Web Applications
Details how to work with authorization and authentication issues in ASP.NET Web applications.
Web Forms Pages
Provides information about how to create forms-based Web pages that are processed on the server.
ASP.NET Server Controls
Introduces the four types of server controls and details how to create and program them in Web Forms pages.
Developing ASP.NET Server Controls
Provides information about events, implementing properties, state management, rendering, templates, data binding, post-back data processing, and so on. This topic also contains samples of complex controls that perform validation and data binding.
Note   User controls are not described here, but they are explained in Web Forms User Controls.
Migrating ASP Pages to ASP.NET
Provides an overview of the main issues that arise when you begin developing Web pages in the ASP.NET environment. Topics include structural (page layout) differences, new data access methods, and changes to the Visual Basic programming language.
Accessing Data with ASP.NET
Provides an overview of working with ADO.NET. Topics cover binding data to ASP.NET server controls and working with Microsoft SQL Server databases programmatically.
ASP.NET Applications
Explains how ASP.NET applications are defined and how to use the Global.asax file.
ASP.NET State Management
Provides details about how to use application state and session state in your Web applications.
HTTP Runtime Support
Provides an overview of how to use IHttpModule and IHttpHandler interfaces. Explains how you can implement and configure custom HTTP handlers to synchronously or asynchronously process selected HTTP Web requests. Also discusses how to create custom HTTP modules that can participate in each request.
ASP.NET Caching Features
Details how the data and output caching mechanisms available through ASP.NET work, as well as how you can use them to help optimize the performance of your Web applications.
XML Web Services Created Using ASP.NET and XML Web Service Clients
Details how to build XML Web services created using ASP.NET and XML Web service clients. XML Web services are applications that provide the ability to exchange messages in a loosely coupled environment using standard protocols such as HTTP, XML, XSD, SOAP, and WSDL. These communications are interoperable with a broad variety of implementations, platforms and devices. The SOAP-based XML messages exchanged between an XML Web service and its clients can have well defined (structured and typed) or loosely defined parts (using arbitrary XML).
ASP.NET Trace
Describes how to troubleshoot your Web Forms pages and ASP.NET applications using the built-in TraceContext class. This class provides methods and properties that allow you to display information about a Web request in an application-wide trace viewer, or in the requested page itself.
ASP.NET Optimization
Provides information on how to create Web applications using ASP.NET that meet your performance requirements.

Side-by-Side Support in ASP.NET

Describes side-by-side support in ASP.NET and explains how to configure ASP.NET applications for side-by-side execution. Applications are said to be running side by side when they are installed on the same computer but use different versions of the .NET Framework.

IIS 6.0 Application Isolation Modes

Describes the application isolation modes in IIS 6.0 and explains how to translate ASP.NET process model settings to application pool settings.

Related Sections

ASP.NET Syntax
Details the declarative syntax you can use to create ASP.NET files without the aid of a rapid application development (RAD) designer. Any ASP.NET feature can be created in text files with the proper file name extension. These include ASP.NET configuration files (Web.config), application files (Global.asax), ASP.NET pages (.aspx files), user controls (.ascx files), and XML Web services (.asmx files). In addition, this section details the declarative syntax for all the ASP.NET server controls.
Accessing Data
Outlines how you can access data throughout the .NET Framework. Included is conceptual information about ADO.NET, the successor to ActiveX Data Objects (ADO), and details about how to use it. It also contains information about how to access and use XML and relational data.
Debugging and Profiling
Explains how to examine and improve the performance of .NET-based applications.
Localizing Resources in ASP.NET Applications
Describes how to deploy and retrieve localized resources in ASP.NET pages and ASP.NET controls.
System.Web Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web namespace, which supplies classes and interfaces that enable communication between browsers and Web servers.
System.Web.Caching Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Caching namespace, which provides classes for caching frequently used resources on the server, independent of page, XML Web service, session, or application.
System.Web.Configuration Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Configuration namespace, which contains classes that are used to configure ASP.NET.
System.Web.Security Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Security namespace, which contains classes that are used to implement ASP.NET security in Web server applications.
System.Web.Services Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Services namespace, which consists of the classes that enable you to create XML Web services using ASP.NET. XML Web services are applications that provide the ability to exchange interoperable messages in a loosely coupled environment using standard protocols such as HTTP, XML, XSD, SOAP and WSDL.
System.Web.Services.Description Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Services.Description namespace, which consists of the classes that enable you to publicly describe an XML Web service by using the Web Services Description Language (WSDL).
System.Web.Services.Discovery Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Services.Discovery namespace, which consists of the classes that allow XML Web service clients to locate the available XML Web services on a Web server through a process called XML Web service discovery.
System.Web.Services.Protocols Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.Services.Protocols namespace, which consists of the classes that define the protocols used to transmit data during the communication between XML Web services created using ASP.NET and their clients.
System.Web.UI Namespace
Contains reference documentation for the System.Web.UI namespace, which contains classes, enumerations, and interfaces that support visible UI for Web Forms.
System.Web.UI.HtmlControls Namespace
Contains reference documentation for System.Web.UI.HtmlControls classes that allow you to create HTML server controls on a Web page. HTML server controls run on the server and map directly to standard HTML tags supported by all browsers. These classes allow you to programmatically control the HTML elements on the Web page.
System.Web.UI.WebControls Namespace
Contains reference documentation for System.Web.UI.WebControls classes that allow you to create Web server controls on a Web page. Web controls run on the server and include form controls such as buttons and text boxes, as well as special purpose controls, such as a Calendar. These classes allow you to programmatically control these elements on a Web page. The Web controls object model does not necessarily reflect HTML syntax.
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