/target (Visual Basic)

Specifies the format of compiler output.

/target:{exe | library | module | winexe | appcontainerexe | winmdobj}

The following table summarizes the effect of the /target option.

Option

Behavior

/target:exe

Causes the compiler to create an executable console application.

This is the default option when no /target option is specified. The executable file is created with an .exe extension.

Unless otherwise specified with the /out option, the output file name takes the name of the input file that contains the Sub Main procedure.

Only one Sub Main procedure is required in the source-code files that are compiled into an .exe file. Use the /main compiler option to specify which class contains the Sub Main procedure.

/target:library

Causes the compiler to create a dynamic-link library (DLL).

The dynamic-link library file is created with a .dll extension.

Unless otherwise specified with the /out option, the output file name takes the name of the first input file.

When building a DLL, a Sub Main procedure is not required.

/target:module

Causes the compiler to generate a module that can be added to an assembly.

The output file is created with an extension of .netmodule.

The .NET common language runtime cannot load a file that does not have an assembly. However, you can incorporate such a file into the assembly manifest of an assembly by using /reference.

When code in one module references internal types in another module, both modules must be incorporated into an assembly manifest by using /reference.

The /addmodule option imports metadata from a module.

/target:winexe

Causes the compiler to create an executable Windows-based application.

The executable file is created with an .exe extension. A Windows-based application is one that provides a user interface from either the .NET Framework class library or with the Win32 APIs.

Unless otherwise specified with the /out option, the output file name takes the name of the input file that contains the Sub Main procedure.

Only one Sub Main procedure is required in the source-code files that are compiled into an .exe file. In cases where your code has more than one class that has a Sub Main procedure, use the /main compiler option to specify which class contains the Sub Main procedure

/target:appcontainerexe

Causes the compiler to create an executable Windows-based application that must be run in an app container. This setting is designed to be used for Windows Store applications.

The appcontainerexe setting sets a bit in the Characteristics field of the Portable Executable file. This bit indicates that the app must be run in an app container. When this bit is set, an error occurs if the CreateProcess method tries to launch the application outside of an app container. Aside from this bit setting, /target:appcontainerexe is equivalent to /target:winexe.

The executable file is created with an .exe extension.

Unless you specify otherwise by using the /out option, the output file name takes the name of the input file that contains the Sub Main procedure.

Only one Sub Main procedure is required in the source-code files that are compiled into an .exe file. If your code contains more than one class that has a Sub Main procedure, use the /main compiler option to specify which class contains the Sub Main procedure

/target:winmdobj

Causes the compiler to create an intermediate file that you can convert to a Windows Runtime binary (.winmd) file. The .winmd file can be consumed by JavaScript and C++ programs, in addition to managed language programs.

The intermediate file is created with a .winmdobj extension.

Unless you specify otherwise by using the /out option, the output file name takes the name of the first input file. A Sub Main procedure isn’t required.

The .winmdobj file is designed to be used as input for the WinMDExp export tool to produce a Windows metadata (WinMD) file. The WinMD file has a .winmd extension and contains both the code from the original library and the WinMD definitions that JavaScript, C++, and the Windows Runtime use.

Unless you specify /target:module, /target causes a .NET Framework assembly manifest to be added to an output file.

Each instance of Vbc.exe produces, at most, one output file. If you specify a compiler option such as /out or /target more than one time, the last one the compiler processes is put into effect. Information about all files in a compilation is added to the manifest. All output files except those created with /target:module contain assembly metadata in the manifest. Use Ildasm.exe (MSIL Disassembler) to view the metadata in an output file.

The short form of /target is /t.

To set /target in the Visual Studio IDE

  1. Have a project selected in Solution Explorer. On the Project menu, click Properties. For more information, see Introduction to the Project Designer.

  2. Click the Application tab.

  3. Modify the value in the Application Type box.

The following code compiles in.vb, creating in.dll:

vbc /target:library in.vb
Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft