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AssemblyHashAlgorithm Enumeration

Specifies all the hash algorithms used for hashing files and for generating the strong name.

Namespace: System.Configuration.Assemblies
Assembly: mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

[SerializableAttribute] 
[ComVisibleAttribute(true)] 
public enum AssemblyHashAlgorithm
/** @attribute SerializableAttribute() */ 
/** @attribute ComVisibleAttribute(true) */ 
public enum AssemblyHashAlgorithm
SerializableAttribute 
ComVisibleAttribute(true) 
public enum AssemblyHashAlgorithm

 Member nameDescription
Supported by the .NET Compact FrameworkMD5Retrieves the MD5 message-digest algorithm. MD5 was developed by Rivest in 1991. It is basically MD4 with safety-belts and while it is slightly slower than MD4, it helps provide more security. The algorithm consists of four distinct rounds, which has a slightly different design from that of MD4. Message-digest size, as well as padding requirements, remain the same. 
Supported by the .NET Compact FrameworkNoneA mask indicating that there is no hash algorithm. If you specify None for a multi-module assembly, the common language runtime defaults to the SHA1 algorithm, since multi-module assemblies need to generate a hash. 
Supported by the .NET Compact FrameworkSHA1A mask used to retrieve a revision of the Secure Hash Algorithm that corrects an unpublished flaw in SHA. 

A hash functionH is a transformation that takes an input m and returns a fixed-size string, which is called the hash value h (that is, h = H (m)). Hash functions with just this property have a variety of general computational uses, but when employed in cryptography, the hash functions are usually chosen to have some additional properties.

The basic requirements for a cryptographic hash function are:

  • The input can be of any length.

  • The output has a fixed length.

  • H (x) is relatively easy to compute for any given x.

  • H (x) is one-way.

  • H (x) is collision-free.

The hash value represents concisely the longer message or document from which it was computed; this value is called the message digest. You can think of a message digest as a digital fingerprint of the larger document. Examples of well-known hash functions are MD2 and and SHA.

Windows 98, Windows 2000 SP4, Windows CE, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows Mobile for Pocket PC, Windows Mobile for Smartphone, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, Windows XP SP2, Windows XP Starter Edition

The .NET Framework does not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 2.0, 1.1, 1.0

.NET Compact Framework

Supported in: 2.0, 1.0

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