Export (0) Print
Expand All

About the BizTalk Message Queuing Adapter

BizTalk Message Queuing (also known as MSMQT) works the same as Microsoft Message Queuing from a network perspective. The main difference is that instead of sending messages to a queue, you send them to a receive location in BizTalk Message Queuing. The receive locations and send ports are accessible in the BizTalk Server Administration console and BizTalk Explorer.

The value that the BizTalk Message Queuing adapter provides is the integration of its message store with the MessageBox database, a database designed to scale out on multiple servers and serve as a central repository for all user data. The BizTalk Message Queuing adapter also provides the following subset of Message Queuing functionality:

  • Binary protocol. Support for the native (MSMQ 1.0) wire protocol.
  • Private queues. Because messages in BizTalk Server are stored in the MessageBox database, a queue in BizTalk Message Queuing is a virtual entity. However, the support queues in its programming interface and remote servers cannot distinguish a Microsoft Message Queuing server from a BizTalk Message Queuing server. The BizTalk Message Queuing adapter supports the sending and receiving of messages into private queues (queues that are not published as Microsoft Active Directory® directory service objects), as well as the sending of messages into remote private queues, but does not support the receiving of messages into local public queues. This private queue support extends to send port groups as well. Send port groups cannot have public queues.
  • Workgroup mode. The BizTalk Message Queuing adapter supports direct messaging to private queues without integration or dependency on Active Directory.
  • Active Directory mode. BizTalk Message Queuing supports DIRECT addresses. With Active Directory it also supports PRIVATE (send/receive) and PUBLIC (send-only) addressing.
  • Transactional and best effort quality of service. The BizTalk Message Queuing adapter supports guaranteed delivery, which is end-to-end reliability, exactly once and in order delivery.

Note  Ordered delivery only works if BizTalk Message Queuing is the primary transport. If the primary transport fails, the adapter does not preserve the end-to-end order, even if the secondary transport is BizTalk Message Queuing.

Note  Just as Microsoft Message Queuing only supports one body part in a message, the BizTalk Message Queuing adapter also only supports one body part in a message.

Additional information about Microsoft Message Queuing features supported by BizTalk Message Queuing can be found in the MSMQ Frequently Asked Questions document at http://go.microsoft.com/FWLink/?LinkID=25024.

The BizTalk Server 2004 BizTalk Message Queuing adapter provides several advantages over the previous version. In previous versions of BizTalk Server, BizTalk sent messages to the Microsoft Message Queuing host, and then to the BizTalk Server host. Now, you only need to route the messages to one host, the BizTalk Server host by using the BizTalk Message Queuing adapter. In addition, the new BizTalk Message Queuing adapter provides support for transactional messaging, once only delivery, and large messages.

Note  You can install the BizTalk Adapter for MSMQ on the same computer that the BizTalk Message Queuing Adapter (MSMQT) is installed on. However, because both these adapters use the same port, you must add an IP address to your computer that the BizTalk Adapter for MSMQ can use. For more information, download Microsoft KnowledgeBase article 895867 from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=52261.

You achieve support for transactional messaging, which is a stream of messages sent in order once, by synchronizing and coordinating multiple BizTalk Message Queuing adapter instances in the group. Because different BizTalk Message Queuing adapter instances may handle multiple messages that you send to the same receive location in one stream, the BizTalk Message Queuing adapter instances maintain persistent state for the delivery engine, which BizTalk keeps in the Configuration database.

The sequence id, sequence number, and previous sequence number properties identify messages in a stream. When you send the first message on a stream, its previous sequence number property is set to zero. For all subsequent messages, the sequence number is the successor of the sequence number property of the previously delivered sequence number property. Likewise, you set its previous sequence number property to the sequence number of the previously delivered message. As Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing attempts to deliver messages to the destinations, some messages may expire, and as a result, the sequence number and previous sequence number properties of the messages that you still need to transmit are not consecutive. For instance, consider a stream containing two messages M1 (sequence number = 1, previous sequence number = 0), and M2 (sequence number = 5, and previous sequence number = 1). Note that messages in a stream may expire without invalidating subsequent messages sent in that stream.

The destination Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing service is responsible for sending order acknowledgments to the source Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing service, indicating the sequence number of the last received message. If the source Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing service does not receive the appropriate order acknowledgment within a certain time limit, it will retransmit the message. Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing service drops messages that are received out-of-order by the destination, because the source Microsoft Message Queuing or BizTalk Message Queuing service will resend them.

In BizTalk Message Queuing, the orchestration can provide the sequence number and previous sequence number, as properties on the BizTalk message itself.

This section contains:

To download updated BizTalk Server 2004 Help from www.microsoft.com, go to http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=20616.

Copyright © 2004 Microsoft Corporation.
All rights reserved.
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft