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sys.fn_my_permissions (Transact-SQL)

Returns a list of the permissions effectively granted to the principal on a securable. A related function is HAS_PERMS_BY_NAME.

Applies to: SQL Server (SQL Server 2008 through current version).

Topic link icon Transact-SQL Syntax Conventions

fn_my_permissions ( securable , 'securable_class' )

securable

Is the name of the securable. If the securable is the server or a database, this value should be set to NULL. securable is a scalar expression of type sysname. securable can be a multipart name.

'securable_class'

Is the name of the class of securable for which permissions are listed. securable_class is a sysname. securable_class must be one of the following: APPLICATION ROLE, ASSEMBLY, ASYMMETRIC KEY, CERTIFICATE, CONTRACT, DATABASE, ENDPOINT, FULLTEXT CATALOG, LOGIN, MESSAGE TYPE, OBJECT, REMOTE SERVICE BINDING, ROLE, ROUTE, SCHEMA, SERVER, SERVICE, SYMMETRIC KEY, TYPE, USER, XML SCHEMA COLLECTION.

The following table lists the columns that fn_my_permissions returns. Each row that is returned describes a permission held by the current security context on the securable. Returns NULL if the query fails.

Column name

Type

Description

entity_name

sysname

Name of the securable on which the listed permissions are effectively granted.

subentity_name

sysname

Column name if the securable has columns, otherwise NULL.

permission_name

nvarchar

Name of the permission.

This table-valued function returns a list of the effective permissions held by the calling principal on a specified securable. An effective permission is any one of the following:

  • A permission granted directly to the principal, and not denied.

  • A permission implied by a higher-level permission held by the principal and not denied.

  • A permission granted to a role or group of which the principal is a member, and not denied.

  • A permission held by a role or group of which the principal is a member, and not denied.

The permission evaluation is always performed in the security context of the caller. To determine whether some other principal has an effective permission, the caller must have IMPERSONATE permission on that principal.

For schema-level entities, one-, two-, or three-part nonnull names are accepted. For database-level entities, a one-part name is accepted, with a null value meaning "current database". For the server itself, a null value (meaning "current server") is required. fn_my_permissions cannot check permissions on a linked server.

The following query will return a list of built-in securable classes:

SELECT DISTINCT class_desc FROM fn_builtin_permissions(default)
    ORDER BY class_desc;
GO

If DEFAULT is supplied as the value of securable or securable_class, the value will be interpreted as NULL.

A. Listing effective permissions on the server

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on the server.

SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions(NULL, 'SERVER');
GO

B. Listing effective permissions on the database

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on the AdventureWorks2012 database.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions (NULL, 'DATABASE');
GO

C. Listing effective permissions on a view

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on the vIndividualCustomer view in the Sales schema of the AdventureWorks2012 database.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('Sales.vIndividualCustomer', 'OBJECT') 
    ORDER BY subentity_name, permission_name ; 
GO 

D. Listing effective permissions of another user

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of database user Wanida on the Employee table in the HumanResources schema of the AdventureWorks2012 database. The caller requires IMPERSONATE permission on user Wanida.

EXECUTE AS USER = 'Wanida';
SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('HumanResources.Employee', 'OBJECT') 
    ORDER BY subentity_name, permission_name ;  
REVERT;
GO

E. Listing effective permissions on a certificate

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on a certificate named Shipping47 in the current database.

SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('Shipping47', 'CERTIFICATE');
GO

F. Listing effective permissions on an XML Schema Collection

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on an XML Schema Collection named ProductDescriptionSchemaCollection in the AdventureWorks2012 database.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('ProductDescriptionSchemaCollection',
    'XML SCHEMA COLLECTION');
GO

G. Listing effective permissions on a database user

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of the caller on a user named MalikAr in the current database.

SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('MalikAr', 'USER');
GO

H. Listing effective permissions of another login

The following example returns a list of the effective permissions of SQL Server login WanidaBenshoof on the Employee table in the HumanResources schema of the AdventureWorks2012 database. The caller requires IMPERSONATE permission on SQL Server login WanidaBenshoof.

EXECUTE AS LOGIN = 'WanidaBenshoof';
SELECT * FROM fn_my_permissions('AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.Employee', 'OBJECT') 
    ORDER BY subentity_name, permission_name ;  
REVERT;
GO

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