Export (0) Print
Expand All

How to: Read Windows Performance Counters 

Some applications and Windows subsystems expose performance data through the Windows performance system. These counters can be accessed using the PerformanceCounterCategory and PerformanceCounter classes, which reside in the System.Diagnostics namespace.

The following code example uses these classes to retrieve and display a counter that is updated by Windows to indicate the percentage of time that the processor is busy.

Example

// processor_timer.cpp
// compile with: /clr
#using <system.dll>

using namespace System;
using namespace System::Threading;
using namespace System::Diagnostics;
using namespace System::Timers;

ref struct TimerObject
{
public:
   static String^ m_instanceName;
   static PerformanceCounter^ m_theCounter;

public:
   static void OnTimer(Object^ source, ElapsedEventArgs^ e)
   {
      try 
      {
         Console::WriteLine("CPU time used: {0,6} ",
          m_theCounter->NextValue( ).ToString("f"));
      } 
      catch(Exception^ e)
      {
         if (dynamic_cast<InvalidOperationException^>(e))
         {
            Console::WriteLine("Instance '{0}' does not exist",
                  m_instanceName);
            return;
         }
         else
         {
            Console::WriteLine("Unknown exception... ('q' to quit)");
            return;
         }
      }
   }
};

int main()
{
   String^ objectName = "Processor";
   String^ counterName = "% Processor Time";
   String^ instanceName = "_Total";

   if ( !PerformanceCounterCategory::Exists(objectName) )
   {
      Console::WriteLine("Object {0} does not exist", objectName);
      return -1;
   }

   if ( !PerformanceCounterCategory::CounterExists(
          counterName, objectName) )
   {
      Console::WriteLine("Counter {0} does not exist", counterName);
      return -1;
   }

   TimerObject::m_instanceName = instanceName;
   TimerObject::m_theCounter = gcnew PerformanceCounter(
          objectName, counterName, instanceName);

   System::Timers::Timer^ aTimer = gcnew System::Timers::Timer();
   aTimer->Elapsed += gcnew ElapsedEventHandler(&TimerObject::OnTimer);
   aTimer->Interval = 1000;
   aTimer->Enabled = true;
   aTimer->AutoReset = true;

   Console::WriteLine("reporting CPU usage for the next 10 seconds");
   Thread::Sleep(10000);
   return 0;
}

See Also

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft