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Creating a Debugger Extension DLL Project (Windows Embedded CE 6.0)

1/5/2010

To create a new debugger extension for Windows Embedded CE 6.0, you can create a new DLL project in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and then configure it to use the required header files. To create a new debugger extension, you must first create a new template DLL project, and then configure the DLL project as a debugger extension, and then configure the DLL project with the Force option.

  1. In Visual Studio 2005, on the File menu, choose New, and then choose Project.

  2. In the New Project dialog box, choose Win32, and then in the Templates window, choose Win32 Project.

  3. In the Name box, type "hello_ext" and then choose OK.

  4. Choose Next.

  5. For Application Type, choose DLL, and then choose Finish.

You now have a template DLL project that you can configure as a debugger extension DLL.

  1. In Visual Studio 2005, on the Project menu, choose hello_ext Properties.

  2. In the Configuration list, choose All Configurations.

  3. Expand C/C++, and then choose General.

  4. Click in the box next to Additional Include Directories, and then choose the gray box.

  5. In the Additional Include Directories dialog box, click in the window, and then click the gray box.

  6. Browse to <your installation drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft Platform Builder\6.00\cepb\EXDI2, choose INCLUDE, and then choose Open.

  7. In the Additional Include Directories dialog box, in the window, double-click underneath the new include directory, and then choose the gray box.

  8. Browse to <your installation drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft Platform Builder\6.00\cepb\SDK, and then choose Include, and then choose Open.

  9. Choose OK.

You now have a template debugger extension DLL project.

  1. In Visual Studio 2005, on the Project menu, choose hello_ext Properties.

  2. Choose Linker, and then choose Command Line.

  3. In the additional options box, type /FORCE:MULTIPLE to create a DLL output file whether or not LINK finds more than one definition for a symbol.

When these steps are complete, you can avoid a build error that is related to multiple definitions for a symbol when you build your DLL.

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