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Working with I/O

The System.IO namespace contains types that allow synchronous and asynchronous reading and writing on data streams and files.

The following distinctions help clarify the differences between a file and a stream. A file is an ordered and named collection of a particular sequence of bytes having persistent storage. Therefore, with files, one thinks in terms of directory paths, disk storage, and file and directory names. In contrast, streams provide a way to write and read bytes to and from a backing store that can be one of several storage mediums. Just as there are several backing stores other than disks, there are several kinds of streams other than file streams. For example, there are network, memory, and tape streams.

In This Section

Basic File I/O
Explains fundamental I/O concepts, introduces the I/O classes, and provides code examples of basic I/O operations.
Composing Streams
Explains the different kinds of streams and their associated backing stores, providing code examples.
Asynchronous File I/O
Describes the performance advantages and basic operation of asynchronous I/O.
Isolated Storage
Describes a data storage mechanism that helps to provide isolation and safety by defining standardized ways of associating code with saved data.
Creating File System and Timer Components
Describes how to monitor file system events and create server-based timers.

Related Sections

Programming with the .NET Framework
Explains common programming tasks that apply to a range of .NET Framework applications.
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